Obituaries

Sep, 2018
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Glenn S. Everett ’88 PhD, of Pembroke, Mass.; Apr. 19, after a struggle with leukemia and other health issues. He taught English at Temple Univ. and the Univ. of Tennessee at Martin. He enjoyed photography, singing, playing tennis, and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Ellen; two sons; a sister; a niece; and two nephews. 

Sep, 2018
GS

Rida M. Mirie ’77 ScM, ’80 PhD, of Lowell, Mass.; Feb. 16. He was a mathematics professor at UMass Lowell. He is survived by a daughter.

 

Sep, 2018
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Richard G. MacKay ’74 MAT, of West Hartford, Conn.; Apr. 9. He taught in Watertown Public Schools and also worked for the State of Connecticut Department of Consumer Protection. He is survived by a brother.

 

Sep, 2018
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Mary Ogden Trotta ’72 MAT, of Clarksboro, N.J.; Apr. 18. She taught English at Woodbury High School for 30 years. After retiring from Woodbury, she joined the Univ. of Pennsylvania’s Literacy Network, where she devoted her time to professional development with teachers across the country. She enjoyed expanding literacy among children in under-resourced school districts. She is survived by her husband, James; a daughter; a son-in-law; and a sister.
 

 

Sep, 2018
GS

Marion Lord Kessen ’72 AM, of Branford, Conn.; May 24. She worked in various positions at Yale Univ., conducting research in the department of psychology. She enjoyed bowling and playing bridge and golf. She served as chairman of the Branford Human Rights Council in the 1960s and enjoyed traveling. She is survived by six children, six grandchildren, and a great-grandson.

 

Sep, 2018
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Arlene Haas Little ’70 AM, ’73 PhD, of Penacook, N.H.; Jan. 2. She had been a professor of psychology at UMass Amherst, retiring in 2002. She is survived by a son, a daughter-in-law, three grandchildren, a sister, and a sister-in-law.

 

Sep, 2018
GS

Linda Daignault Howell ’69 MAT, of New Bern, N.C.; Mar. 29. After moving to Boston in 1974, she worked for the New England Governors Council. In 1976 she cofounded the Council for Northeast Economic Action, which became an international consulting firm focused on creating opportunities for growth in New England. She later moved to New Bern and focused on historic preservation and gardening as a member of the New Bern Preservation and Historical Society. As a member of the Questers, she worked to raise funds to restore Cedar Grove Cemetery. She enjoyed gardening, cooking, reading, and traveling. She is survived by her husband, Jim; a son; a daughter-in-law; and a sister.

 

Sep, 2018
GS

Vittorio A. Bonomo ’69 PhD, of Blacksburg, Va.; Apr. 20, 2017. He began teaching at UC Santa Barbara. He subsequently taught at Virginia Tech in the College of Business for 48 years and was a winner of the William E. Wine Award for Teaching Excellence. He was a financial advisor to two Virginia governors and served on advisory boards for many banks and financial institutions spanning his career. He enjoyed painting, Virginia Tech football, and cooking. He is survived by his wife, Jane; a daughter; a son-in-law; two grandchildren; a sister; and a brother.

 

Sep, 2018
GS

Fred I. Cooperstock ’66 PhD, of Victoria, B.C.; Jan. 17. He was a physics professor at the Univ. of Victoria. He enjoyed photography, writing, playing badminton, and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Ruth; a daughter; a son; four grandchildren; and a sister.

 

Sep, 2018
GS

Marjorie Harvey Purves ’65 AM, of Worcester, Mass.; Mar. 27, of lung cancer. She ran the volunteer program of the palliative care unit at UMass Memorial Medical Center for 10 years. She served on the board of Daybreak, then stepped down to be executive director until the early 1990s. After leaving Daybreak, she worked for the Battered Women’s Coalition in Boston. She was also a mediator for the court system for many years. She sang with the Worcester Choral Society and enjoyed poetry. She is survived by two daughters, a son-in-law, a grandson, a sister, and several nieces and nephews.
 

 

Sep, 2018
GS

Gordon R. Williamson ’64 ScM, of Hanover, N.H.; Feb. 15. He worked as an intellectual property lawyer in Boston before joining the staff of Byte magazine in the 1970s. In retirement he founded a nonprofit organization supporting artisans in Rwanda, authored a career guide for young lawyers, and volunteered with the Dartmouth athletics department. He is survived by a daughter, a son, a stepdaughter, three grandchildren, and a brother.

 

Sep, 2018
GS

Rozanne Karibian Arzoomanian ’62 MAT (see ’45).

 

Sep, 2018
GS

Robert E. Green Jr. ’56 ScM, ’59 PhD, of Towson, Md. He was an associate professor at the Johns Hopkins Univ. in Baltimore. He is survived by his wife, Sydney; two daughters; and three grandchildren.

Sep, 2018
GS

Ryozo G. Kumekawa ’55 AM, of Wakefield, R.I.; Apr. 16. He served as the director of city planning for the City of Warwick (R.I.) from 1958 to 1972. He was then appointed as the executive assistant for Policy and Program Review for Gov. Noel of Rhode Island, serving from 1973 to 1977. From 1977 to 1979 he was the executive director of the Coalition of Northeastern Governors Policy Research Center, and from 1980 until his retirement in 1998, he was the director of the URI Graduate Program in Community Planning. He was honored with the distinguished leadership award by the Rhode Island Chapter of the American Planning Assoc. in 1996 and was elected a fellow in the American Institute of Certified Planners in 2001. He is survived by his wife, Yoshiko; three children; and several nieces and nephews.

 

Sep, 2018
GS

Charles A. Pleasance ’53 AM (see ’50).
 

 

Sep, 2018
GS

Alice Slavin Krafft ’47 ScM, of Alexandria, Va.; Feb. 23. She was a retired science teacher. She is survived by eight children, 13 grandchildren, five great-grandchildren, and a sister.

 

Sep, 2018
GS

Richard N. Berry ’41 ScM, ’47 PhD, of Bloomington, Ind.; Feb. 26. He was a professor of psychology and brain sciences at Indiana State Univ. from 1947 until his retirement in 1987. He enjoyed following the stock market, gardening, and playing golf. He is survived by a sister-in-law, nieces, and nephews.

 

Sep, 2018
07

David Warren ’07, of New York City; Mar. 13. He is survived by his wife, Ali; his parents Bob ’73 and Sandy Wogrin Warren ’75; and sisters Susan Weston ’03 and Sharon Persson ’05.

 

Sep, 2018
87

Lawrence B. Gardner ’87, of New York City; Mar. 27, of lymphoma. He was associate professor of medicine and associate professor of biochemistry and molecular pharmacology at NYU Langone Medical Center. He attended patients, performed research, and taught students. He was a fellow at Johns Hopkins Univ. and the head of the hematology oncology fellowship at NYU. Phi Beta Kappa. He is survived by a daughter, his mother, a sister, and a brother.

 

Sep, 2018
84

Gay Tokumaru Bessen ’84, of Williamsburg, Va.; Mar. 9, of cancer. She was chief of optometry at the Hampton VA Medical in Hampton, Va. She enjoyed the outdoors and traveling. She is survived by her husband, Andy; her mother; and two brothers.

 

Sep, 2018
84

Elizabeth Olarsch Hunter ’84, of Gardiner, N.Y., formerly of Portland, Me.; Dec. 5, from a cerebral hemorrhage while awaiting a bone marrow transplant due to myeloid leukemia. She was a concert pianist and trained in Musical Munchkins, developmentally staged techniques for teaching music to children. After relocating to Gardiner, she opened a Musical Munchkins branch in New Paltz, N.Y. At Brown she was a member of the Chattertocks. She and her husband established the Free at Last band and toured the New England college circuit, eventually recording an album in 1996 title One Woman’s Song. She enjoyed music and raising her family. She is survived by her husband, Tim; two daughters; and two sons.

 

Sep, 2018
83

Paul R. Kemp ’83, of Seattle; Aug. 12, 2017. He was injured shortly after graduating from Brown, leaving him quadriplegic. After a year in the hospital and rehab, he moved to Seattle to continue his studies and obtained a ScM from the Univ. of Washington in 1993. He is survived by his mother and many friends.  

 

Sep, 2018
82

Andrew L. Shapiro ’82, of North Bethesda, Md.; Mar. 16, of multiple system atrophy. He practiced law in Houston, Tex., and Washington, D.C. He went on to assume a leadership role as a senior vice president at CAN insurance. He enjoyed sports, cheering for the Boston Red Sox and the Duke Blue Devils, playing golf, and being involved in Fantasy Football. He is survived by his wife, Sharon; a daughter; a son; his mother; and a brother.

Sep, 2018
80

Peter M. Kriff ’80, of Columbus, Ohio; Mar. 26, of cancer. He was head of his own advertising/design agency in Burlington and a 30-year member of the Vermont Jazz Ensemble. For the last 10 years he was executive director of the Vermont Statewide Independent Living council. He is survived by his wife, Robyn; a son; a stepson; his mother; a sister; and a brother.

 

Sep, 2018
78

Charles W. Reckard ’78, of Warwick, R.I.; Mar. 21. He managed Brown’s Grad Center Bar, Pot au Feu; Leo’s; and other restaurants and nightclubs in the Providence area for several years. After leaving the service industry, he worked for more than 25 years at Cox Communications, where he was a producer, director, editor, and audio engineer specializing in live event programming. He was the recipient of four Emmy Awards for excellence in broadcasting. He is survived by his wife, Lucia O’Reilly ’74; four brothers; and two sisters-in-law.

 

Sep, 2018
78

Peter V. Kocot ’78, of Florence, Mass.; Feb. 27, after a brief illness. He was chief of staff for State Rep. Bill Nagle for more than 20 years. At the time of his death he held the title of chairman of the Joint Committee on Health Care Finance. During his tenure he was instrumental in the fight for civil rights, same-sex marriage rights, and landmark ethics reform. In 2015 he led the charge to reform and modernize Massachusetts’s public records laws. At Brown he was a member of the 1976 Ivy League championship football team. He enjoyed fishing and cooking. He is survived by his wife, Shauneen; two sons; four siblings; and several nieces and nephews.

 

Sep, 2018
78

Susan Costabile Bubna ’78, of Colony, Kans.; Mar. 22. She was a nurse for more than 10 years at Olathe Medical Center. Later, she pastored the Colony Community Church, served as a drama coach at the local high school for several years, coordinated the Good News Club for 20 years, and directed theater for young adults with the Garnett Chamber Players Community Theater. She enjoyed biking, writing poetry, traveling, and taking care of her farm animals. She is survived by her husband, Stephen; three daughters; a sister; and a brother.
 

 

Sep, 2018
75

Susan Hayes Woods ’75, of Ocala, Fla.; Apr. 16. She was a riding instructor and competitor. She practiced dressage at her Four Winds Farm and traveled to judge and give instructional clinics across the country. A self-taught environmentalist, she worked on land use, farmland preservation, and water management in north-central Florida. She was honored by 1000 Friends of Florida and received a Florida Community Stewardship Award. She was recognized with an Unsung Hero Award by the UF Public Interest Environmental Conference. She was also a Reiki master and a student of Shamanism. She is survived by her husband, Bill; a sister; and a brother.

 

Sep, 2018
71

William M. Abraham ’71, of Miami; Jan. 14, of prostate cancer. He spent nearly 40 years as director of medical research at Mt. Sinai Medical Center in Miami Beach. He is survived by his wife, Kay; two sons and their spouses; three grandchildren; a sister; and several nieces and nephews.
 

 

Sep, 2018
67

Gene F. Armstrong ’67, of Pawtucket, R.I.; Apr. 18. She was a self-employed computer consultant, an avid yoga enthusiast, and an experienced mediator. She is survived by a brother.

 

Sep, 2018
66

Robert E. Ginsberg ’66, of Oak Park, Ill.; Mar. 17, from Parkinson’s. He was a U.S. bankruptcy judge for the Northern District of Illinois from 1985 until his retirement in 2003. He had served as a trial attorney and special counsel with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission in Washington, D.C., prior to his judicial appointment. He was a professor at DePaul Univ. College of Law from 1974 to 1985, as well as a visiting professor at the Univ. of Illinois Law School in 1984. He was a member of the Illinois Attorney Registration and Disciplinary Commission and vice chair of the National Bankruptcy Review Commission from 1995 to 1997. He was the original author of Ginsberg on Bankruptcy, which later was known as Ginsberg & Martin on Bankruptcy. Together the two authors lectured in the field of bankruptcy law. He enjoyed skiing, playing golf, and playing goalie in the Chicago Park District ice hockey arena. He is survived by his wife, Gail Cohen Ginsberg ’66; two daughters, including Deborah Ginsberg ’91; two grandchildren; a sister; two brothers-in-law; and several nieces and nephews.

 

Sep, 2018
65

Jane A. Adams ’65, of Pownal, Vt.; Mar. 2. After practicing law in New York City and being a staff attorney for the NYC Commission on Human Rights, she moved to Pownal in 1975. She practiced law in Bennington, Vt., and later rescued four thoroughbreds, cats, and dogs and dubbed her home Funny Farm. She held horse shows that enabled children to become riders and enjoy the horses and farm. She was a member of the Chattertocks.  She is survived by two nieces and a nephew.

 

Sep, 2018
64

Clifford Adelman ’64, of Kensington, Md.; May 3, of cancer. He is survived by his wife, Nancy, and two sons.
 

 

Sep, 2018
63

William R. Caroselli ’63, of Pittsburgh; May 17. He was the founding member of the Caroselli, Beachler & Coleman law firm in Pittsburgh. He has been listed in the Best Lawyers in America and Pennsylvania Super Lawyers. He was a member of the Allegheny County (Pennsylvania) and American Bar Associations. He served as president of the Allegheny County Academy of Trial Lawyers and the Pennsylvania Assoc. for Justice. He was chairman of the Disciplinary Board of the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania and elected a 1989 Fellow in the International Academy of Trial Lawyers. He is survived by his wife, Dusty; two daughters; two sons; and a grandchild.

 

Sep, 2018
62

Andrea Jacobson Grant ’62, of New Haven, Conn.; Apr. 4. She worked as a special education teacher. She enjoyed reading, gardening, and attending movies. She is survived by two daughters, two grandchildren, and two brothers.

 

Sep, 2018
61

Joseph A. Cerutti ’61, of Center Harbor, N.H.; May 13. He taught industrial arts at Ashland High School (Massachusetts) before beginning a long career in the home building business. He worked for William Bell Associates in Ashland, Brill Homes in Vermont, and Hodgdon Homes in Maine before moving to Center Harbor to work at Prescott Homes in Meredith, N.H. In 1982 he cofounded Cerutti Custom Homes, which he managed until his retirement in 2007. He was an active member of the Lakes Region Home Builders Assoc. and in 1994 was named the Lakes Region Home Builder of the year. At Brown, he was a member of the football and rugby teams, ROTC, and Kappa Sigma. He enjoyed hiking, skiing, reading, traveling, and attending the theater. He is survived by his wife, Susan; two sons; a daughter-in-law; four sisters; a brother; and several nieces and nephews.

 

Sep, 2018
61

William R. Biers ’61, of Columbia, Mo.; Apr. 12, from complications of Alzheimer’s. He was employed at the American School of Classical Studies in Athens, Greece, before joining the faculty at the Univ. of Missouri in 1968. He taught classes in Greek art and archaeology until his retirement in 2001. In retirement he continued to teach Ancient Technology, a course he created to interest undergraduate engineering students. He served on many university committees, including the campus library committee, of which he was chair from 1999 to 2001. A classical archaeologist, he excavated in Turkey and Israel; was director of excavations at ancient Phlius, Greece; and was codirector of excavations at Mirobriga, Portugal. His many publications included The Archaeology of Greece: An Introduction; Mirobriga: Investigations of an Iron Age and Chronology in Classical Archaeology; and Art, Artifacts and Chronology in Classical Archaeology. He is survived by his wife, Jane; a daughter; a daughter-in-law; and two grandsons.
 

 

Sep, 2018
60

Nail M. Senozan ’60, of Long Beach, Calif.; Apr. 29. He was a chemistry professor and researcher at Cal State Long Beach, where he was named University Outstanding Professor. He was appointed chair of the chemistry department in 1996 and served in this capacity until his retirement in 2007. Phi Beta Kappa. He is survived by his wife, Diane.

 

Sep, 2018
60

Gordon E. Wood ’60, of Danvers, Mass.; Apr. 7. For three years he was the English department chairman at Timberlane Regional High School in Plaistow, N.H. In 1972 he was appointed the coordinator of Language Arts for the Melrose Junior and Senior High Schools. He retired from secondary education in 2001. In addition, he was an adjunct professor in English at Middlesex Community College in both Lowell and Bedford, Mass., for 23 years and taught English composition and literature at North Shore and Northern Essex Community Colleges. He enjoyed following the Red Sox, reading, dancing, and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Diane; two sons and their wives; two step-daughters; and three grandsons.

 

Sep, 2018
60

John D. Ross ’60, of West Falmouth, Mass.; Mar. 8. He had a career in the Boston financial district, did nonprofit management consulting, and, in retirement, environmental stewardship as past chair of the board of Buzzards Bay Coalition, as well as serving as a board member at Cape Cod Maritime Museum. He is survived by his wife, Martha; a daughter; two sons; and six grandchildren.

 

Sep, 2018
60

Theodore C. Anderson Jr. ’60, of Conway, S.C.; Apr. 20. He served in the U.S. Marine Corps and later in the U.S. Marine Corps Reserves for nine years, discharged with the rank of captain. He was a buyer for Bloomingdale’s and Allied stores, both in New York. He also owned and operated Ted’s East End Market in Southampton, N.Y., for 20 years. He is survived by his wife, Diane; four children and their spouses; five grandchildren; and a great-grandson.
 

 

Sep, 2018
59

Charles M. Trammell III ’59, of Chevy Chase, Md.; Apr. 14. He was a junior officer in the U.S. Navy and later an instructor at the Navy’s nuclear prototype at Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory site in New York. In 1967 he joined Public Service Electric and Gas Co. in Newark, N.J., and assisted with the licensing of the company’s Salem Nuclear Generating Station in New Jersey. He joined the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in Bethesda, Md., in 1975 and was a licensing project manager for numerous nuclear facilities. He retired from NRC in 1993. He was a member of the West River Sailing Club and served as commodore in 2002. He enjoyed playing the flute, piano, and clarinet. He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth; three children; and six grandchildren.
 

 

Sep, 2018
59

Carroll Trainor Stein ’59, of Sedona, Ariz., formerly of Chicago; Mar. 11. She taught English and social studies in Chicago, was a residential fellow at the Univ. of Chicago, and then raised a family. She later returned to teaching and was a professor at Washburn Univ. in Topeka, Kans. Phi Beta Kappa. She is survived by her husband, Robert ’59; two daughters, including Leah Kimmet ’98; a son, Adam ’93; and six grandchildren.

 

Sep, 2018
58

James Alaimo ’58, of Cumberland, R.I.; May 10. Better known as “Gerry” to the Brown community, came to Brown as a basketball center and left as one of the University’s all-time leading scorers with 1,046 points, having served as co-captain of the Bruins in his senior year, been named to the All-Ivy team, and won the J. Richmond Fales Trophy as the player who had made the greatest contribution to Brown basketball. After graduation he served in the U.S. Army, worked for a short time in the insurance industry and returned to Brown in 1963 to coach the freshman team. After one year, he left to coach Middlebury College basketball, where he remained for five years before returning to Brown as head coach. In 1974 he was inducted into Brown’s Athletic Hall of Fame and in 2006, in recognition of his accomplishments as a player, was named to Brown’s All-Time Team at the 100th anniversary celebration. After 10 years as head coach at Brown (1969-1979), he accepted a position as an administrator in the Providence College athletic department. He retired from Providence College in 2001 as senior associate athletics director and was inducted into the Providence College Athletics Hall of Fame in 2011.

 

Sep, 2018
58

David Jenkins ’58, of Pompano Beach, Fla.; Apr. 18. He was ordained to the Sacred Order of Deacons in the Episcopal Church on June 17, 1961, and then to the Sacred Order of Priests on Dec. 23, 1961. He would continue to serve until his passing. He served at churches in the dioceses of Rhode Island, New York, the Windward Islands, and Trinidad and Tobago. From 1970 to 1991 he held multiple administrative and leadership positions at SUNY Albany. In 1991 he took early retirement from academia, bought a sailboat, and headed to the Caribbean to serve. In 2002 he sold the boat and moved to Florida. He is survived by a brother and sister-in-law, nieces, and nephews.  

 

Sep, 2018
56

Donald I. Trott ’56, of Wayne, N.J.; May 4, of pancreatic cancer. He was a retired financial analyst and founder of the Consumer Analyst Group of New York. He had a 50-year career on Wall Street. He was active in his community and enjoyed mentoring future analysts. He is survived by his wife, Frances; two daughters; and two granddaughters.

 

Sep, 2018
56

Seymour G. Karnes ’56, of Palm Coast, Fla., formerly of Warwick, R.I.; May 11. He was a retired textile chemist for the former Sequoia Chemical Co. of Providence. He was a veteran of the U.S. Air Force, a 1996 heart transplant recipient, and a member and former two-term commander of the Jewish War Veterans of Palm Coast. An avid New York Yankees fan, he enjoyed all sports, playing bridge, and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Charlotte; two daughters; a son; two sons-in-law; and three grandchildren.

 

Sep, 2018
56

Charles H. Eden Jr. ’56, of Saunderstown, R.I.; Apr. 14. He was an area sales manager for Nicholson File Co. in Providence. He retired in 1996 as vice president of sales for the former Russell Harrington Cutlery Co. in Southbridge, Mass. During the Korean War, he served in the U.S. Army. An avid golfer, he was a founding member of Clinton Country Club (Connecticut) and a longtime member of Wannamoisett Country Club (Rhode Island). He enjoyed building and flying remote controlled aircraft and was a member of the Academy of Model Aeronautics. He is survived by his wife, Paula; a daughter; a son; a son-in-law; a sister; and several nieces and nephews.
 

 

Sep, 2018
55

Eliot Fiske Sugerman ’55, of Fort Myers, Fla., formerly of Shaker Heights, Ohio; Mar. 30. She was a college consultant in the Cleveland area before retiring to Sanibel Island, Fla., in 1982 and selling real estate with Merrill Lynch Realty. She was an avid reader and enjoyed playing bridge and tap dancing. She is survived by her companion, Jerry, and two daughters.

 

Sep, 2018
55

Edmond A. Neal ’55, of Cranston, R.I.; Apr. 10. He was president of the former Russell Harrington Cutlery in Southbridge, Mass. He retired in 1996. He had also been president of Washington Forge in New Jersey and the American Cutlery Manufacturers Assoc. He was on the board of Hyde Manufacturing Co. and Harrington Hospital in Southbridge and a deacon of the Roman Catholic Church in Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was a U.S. Marine Corps veteran. He is survived by his wife, Beatrice; two daughters; five sons, including Edmond A. Neal III ’76; three daughters-in-law; two sons-in-law; 13 grandchildren; a sister, Judy Neal Murray ’63; a brother, Kenneth R. Neal ’66; a sister-in-law; a brother-in-law; and a niece, Stephanie Nicolas ’94.

 

Sep, 2018
55

Norman M. Bouton ’55, of Washington, D.C.; Apr. 7. He served his country as a U.S. Naval lieutenant and Foreign Service Officer. He was posted in Rio, Naples, Athens, and Mexico City, and was chargé d’affaires in Antigua. He enjoyed sailing, medieval history, and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Jane Philipp Bouton ’56; three children; and five grandsons.

 

Sep, 2018
54

Virginia Fellows Maloney ’54, of Charlotte, N.C.; May 19. She was a homemaker and volunteer. She enjoyed playing bridge and traveling. She is survived by her husband, William ’51; a daughter; a son-in-law; and three grandchildren.

 

Sep, 2018
54

Robert I. Kramer ’54, of Dallas; Mar. 5. He was a founding partner of Pediatric Associates of Dallas, president of the medical staff at Children’s Medical Center of Dallas, and chairman of the department of pediatrics at Baylor Univ. Medical Center, where he founded the Baylor Pediatric Center for Restorative Care. He was also a faculty member and clinical professor of pediatrics and pulmonology at UT Southwestern Medical Center. He was well-known for his work treating cystic fibrosis patients, primarily through Children’s Medical Center. He was a fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics, a diplomate of the American Board of Pediatrics, and a member of the American College of Physician Executives. He is survived by his wife, Joan; four daughters, including Lisa Morgan ’86 and Megan Kramer ’93; a brother, Frederick ’52; and nephews James Kramer ’85 and Andrew Kramer ’88.

 

Sep, 2018
54

Nathaniel W. Horton ’54, of Yorba Linda, Calif., formerly of Northbrook, Ill.; Mar. 23. After passing the Illinois State Bar, he entered into a legal career and advanced through a series of positions at Continental Illinois National Bank, Illinois Central Railroad, United Airlines, and the First National Bank of Evanston (Illinois), where he became vice president and head of the Trust Department. In 1972 he moved to California and was chief legal officer of Capital Guardian Trust in Los Angeles. After further positions with United California Bank and First Interstate Bank, he began a private practice with his wife, Horton & Horton, specializing in estate and family matters. He enjoyed singing in performing groups such as the Over the Hill Gang and Jabberwocks. He also enjoyed traveling and playing golf. He was a U.S. Army veteran of the Korean War and is survived by his wife, Kathleen; a daughter, a son; a stepdaughter; two granddaughters; and three great-grandchildren.

 

Sep, 2018
54

Mary Sisk Caulfield ’54, of San Rafael, Calif.; May 8, after a long illness. She was a physician at Spencer and King Orthopedic Group in Philadelphia. She moved to Bethesda, Md., where she worked for the Department of Education and later, after moving to San Rafael, she worked in the emergency department of Letterman Hospital and then the Permanente Medical Group in San Rafael. She retired from practice in 1996. She enjoyed painting and woodworking and was a ham radio operator and an avid gardener. Phi Beta Kappa. She is survived by her husband, Harry; a daughter; three sons, including Walter H. Caulfield III ’84 and James ’86; 13 grandchildren, including Walter H. Caulfield IV ’15; a sister, Jane Sisk ’63; and nephews John Willems ’85 and James Willems ’89.

 

Sep, 2018
53

Ann Thomas Moring ’53, of Annapolis; Apr. 6. She was a homemaker and a volunteer in schools, nature centers, and libraries. She enjoyed gardening, reading, cooking, sewing, knitting, and solving crossword puzzles. She is survived by a daughter, two sons, and five grandchildren.  

 

Sep, 2018
53

Rose Dolce Maxwell ’53, of Webster, N.Y.; Mar. 10. She was a retired high school English teacher. She enjoyed traveling and is survived by her husband, Vincent; six children; five grandchildren; and a brother.

 

Sep, 2018
53

David A. Lownes ’53, of Needham, Mass.; May 18, of complications from Parkinson’s. He worked at the family company, American Silk Spinning, before leaving to work at Brown & Bigelow advertising firm in Boston. He had a passion for antiques and Chinese Export Art and served on the board of directors for the Peabody Essex Museum, the Forbes House Museum of Milton, and Gore Place in Waltham. He is survived by his wife, Rosamond; a daughter; a son; and three grandchildren.

 

Sep, 2018
53

Charles E. Dyer Jr. ’53, of Waterford, Conn.; May 4, after a brief illness. He was a retired pharmacist. He owned and operated Dyer’s Pharmacy in New London, Conn., for 50 years. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army and enjoyed traveling, playing golf, and rooting for the Boston Red Sox. He is survived by a daughter, a son, a son-in-law, a granddaughter, and his companion, Elin Schoonmaker.

 

Sep, 2018
52

Margaret Caldwell Karb ’52, of Williamsburg, Va., formerly of Morristown, N.J., and Southborough, Mass.; Apr. 8. After raising a family, she worked for 10 years at Wellesley College, assisting in the science department and the alumni office. She visited all 50 states and all the Canadian provinces, as well as every continent except Antarctica. She enjoyed reading English literature and books on American history and traveling. She is survived by her husband, Alan ’53; four children, including James Karb ’86, ’88 MAT; six grandchildren; and two siblings.

 

Sep, 2018
52

Warren R. Jewett ’52, of Cary, N.C., formerly of Tucson, Ariz., and Woodbridge, Conn.; Apr. 20. He was a biomedical engineer. While living in Connecticut, he built a business designing biomedical instruments that was purchased by Schick in 1970. In 1975 he joined the faculty of the Univ. of Arizona in the electrical engineering department, from which he retired in 1985. He was involved in several business ventures during the course of his career, including being president of Sonodyne America Ltd., CEO of IEP Group, and president of the National Hemophilia Foundation; he held numerous patents on his inventions. He enjoyed reading and spending time at Smith Mountain Lake in Virginia. He is survived by his wife, Brenda; two daughters, including Tamison Jewett ’75; a son; nine grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; and a sister.

 

Sep, 2018
52

Albert W. Heinz ’52, of Mechanicsburg, Pa.; Feb. 19. He was a retired branch manager for IBM in Camp Hill, Pa. He is survived by two daughters, three grandchildren, and a great-grandson.

 

Sep, 2018
52

William E. Downey Jr. ’52, of Pawtucket, R.I.; Mar. 24. After Brown, he studied theology at Boston Univ. and was ordained in 1955. He worked in Pawtucket at Smithfield Avenue Congregational Church before getting a doctorate from Andover Newton Theological School. In 1970, he and his wife had a joint ministry appointment at Edgewood Congregational Church in Cranston, R.I. They moved to Berlin, Germany, in 1977 and worked in the German church and at two hospitals as chaplains. He retired in 1996 and traveled back and forth from Germany to the United States to enjoy the Rhode Island beaches and family. He is survived by his wife, Sabine; a daughter; a son; and two grandchildren.

 

Sep, 2018
52

Chen Yang ’52, of Columbus, Ohio; May 1. He taught physics at Ohio State Univ. until his retirement in 1998. He enjoyed playing tennis and ping pong and is survived by his wife, Barbara; a daughter; a son; a son-in-law; two grandchildren; a sister; and two brothers.

 

Sep, 2018
51

Joan Laboissoniere Lisi ’51, of Wakefield, R.I., formerly of Sharon, Pa.; May 19. She was a pediatric nurse prior to switching career paths and becoming a flight attendant for United Airlines. In 1977 she moved to Rhode Island and worked for Scallop Nursing Home while completing her master’s in gerontology. She enjoyed learning, reading, cooking, and traveling. She is survived by four children, a stepson, four grandchildren, and a great-granddaughter.

 

Sep, 2018
51

Edward H. Toole ’51, of Whately, Mass.; Mar. 28. He had a 30-year career with the CIA, specializing in Russian and European countries. He also served a tour as executive secretary of the U.S. Economic Intelligence Agencies board. He was a veteran of the U.S. Marines and enjoyed traveling. He is survived by his wife, Barbara, and seven children.

 

Sep, 2018
51

Peter N. Kondon ’51, of Acton, Mass.; May 18. A retired dentist. He served in the U.S. Coast Guard before attending Tufts Dental School and practicing in Concord, Mass. He enjoyed playing golf and spending time with his children and grandchildren. He is survived by his wife, Julie; a daughter, Mary Kondon Toth ’81; two sons, including Nicholas ’84; two daughters-in-law; a son-in-law; and eight grandchildren.

 

Sep, 2018
51

Maxwell A. Howell ’51, of Washington, D.C.; May 4. A lawyer, he spent the majority of his legal career as a sole practitioner specializing in transportation. He was an accomplished musician; he performed in the U.S. Army Band, duos, trios, and quartets, and was a member of the Alexandria Citizens Band. He was a skilled marksman and a model railroad hobbyist, and he enjoyed deep sea diving, woodworking, reading, bicycling, and photography. He is survived by his wife, Jill; daughter, Patricia Geyer ’78, ’80 AM; a son; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; five stepchildren; and eight grandchildren.

 

Sep, 2018
51

Harold C. Fisher ’51, of North Conway, N.H.; Mar. 22. After serving in the U.S. Navy, he began a career in the investment business. He worked in Boston for several investment firms and retired in 1987 from MASSCO Investments. He then founded Conway Investment Management Services, where he managed individual investments until his early 80s. He was commodore of the Conway Lake Sailing Assoc. and served on the Conway Lake Conservation Assoc. for more than 25 years. In addition to sailing, he enjoyed skiing, fishing, hiking, and playing tennis. He is survived by his wife, Marge; a daughter; two sons; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; seven grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; and a sister.

 

Sep, 2018
51

Dimas Costa ’51, of Rumford, R.I.; Apr. 3. He worked as a civil engineer from 1952 to 1998 and served in the U.S. Army during World War II. He is survived by five children and their spouses, including son Daniel ’74; daughter Elizabeth M. Costa ’87; 11 grandchildren, including Hilary Costa ’06, Paul Costa’07, Laura Costa ’13, Elizabeth J. Costa ’14, and John Costa ’20; and a sister.

 

Sep, 2018
51

Ronald J. Burns ’51, of Jacksonville, Fla., formerly of Connecticut; Mar. 12. He began his financial career as an analyst for J.P. Morgan, specializing in the oil industry, then working at Amerada Hess. He later was a financial executive at CIGNA. In 1964 he joined the Home Insurance Co. in New York City, where he rose to executive vice president and in 1978 joined the Bank of Boston as chief investment officer. After moving to Florida in 1985, he founded Augustine Asset Management, where he served as chief executive officer before retiring in his 80s. He also served on several boards over the course of his career and was a former trustee of Brown and a U.S. Army veteran. He enjoyed golf, tennis, bridge, skiing, reading, and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Carol; three daughters; a son; a daughter-in-law; two sons-in-law; seven grandchildren; a great-grandchild; two sisters and their spouses; several nieces and nephews; and his former wife.

 

Sep, 2018
50

John R. Welchli ’50, of Grosse Pointe, Mich.; Mar. 23. He was vice president and treasurer of Securities Counsel Inc. in Jackson, Mich., and owner of Investment Counsel Inc. in Grosse Pointe. At Brown he was a swimmer, ran track for four years, and captained the cross-country team. He began rowing after an accident and became a member of the U.S. team that took a silver medal in the four-man crew at the 1956 Olympic Games in Melbourne, Australia. He was involved in U.S. National and Canadian Henley National championships in sculling and sweep rowing and for many years held the national record in the lightweight single and double. In 1979 he was inducted into the Brown Athletic Hall of Fame. In recent years he rowed in the veterans categories at Head of the Charles Regatta in Boston. He is survived by his wife, Lynn; two sons; a grandson; and a brother.

Sep, 2018
50

Charles H. Stephens ’50, of Easton, Md.; Mar. 3. He had a U.S. Navy military career and moved all over the world. In retirement while living in Easton, he was active in volunteer work.  

 

Sep, 2018
50

Fredi Kovitch Solod ’50, of Warwick and Providence, R.I., formerly of Morristown, Tenn.; Mar. 26, of complications of Alzheimer’s. She was a published short story writer and essayist and for years wrote a weekly column for the Citizen-Tribune newspaper in Morristown. Her columns were later collected in a book entitled Is Anyone Listening? While in Providence, she worked in Brown’s Office of Development as a proposal writer and retired as director of publications. She acted with the Morristown Theatre Guild, was outspoken for women’s rights, and volunteered for the League of Women Voters and the American Red Cross. She was a lifetime member of Hadassah and a member of the National Council of Jewish Women. She was also a member of the board of Friends of Trinity and the Friends of the Rhode Island Philharmonic. She enjoyed traveling the world and doing photography work. She is survived by three daughters, including Lisa Solod ’78, and their spouses; four grandchildren; and two sisters, including Seena Kovitch Dittelman ’51.
 

 

Sep, 2018
50

Charles A. Pleasance ’50, ’53 AM, of Greenville, Del.; Mar. 18. He was a retired manager of Wescom Inc. in Downers Grove, Ill. During his long career in the telephone industry, he had an interest in the history of the independent telephone industry and self-published a book on the subject in 1989, The Spirit of Independent Telephony. He was a member of the Independent Telephone Pioneer Assoc. He is survived by three daughters and their spouses, five grandchildren, a great-grandson, and a sister.
 

 

Sep, 2018
50

Henry W. McGreen ’50, of Narragansett, R.I.; Mar. 17. After serving in the U.S. Army for two years, he joined the U.S. Rubber Co. in Providence and worked in its human resource department. He later worked as a trust officer for Industrial National Bank and then was co-owner of Haxton’s Tollgate Liquors Inc. in Warwick, R.I., where he worked for 50 years before retiring in 2005. He was past president and board member of the Rhode Island Amateur Hockey Assoc. and a member of the Cranston (R.I.) Advisory Committee on Parks and Recreation. He enjoyed playing golf and is survived by his wife, Florence; nine children; 19 grandchildren; and six great-grandchildren.

 

Sep, 2018
50

Joseph J. Magsamen ’50, of East Providence, R.I.; Apr. 28. He was a self-employed insurance consultant who founded New England Insurance Assoc. in 1958, and Surplus Lines Inc. in East Providence in 1978. He enjoyed playing golf and belonged to country clubs in Rhode Island and Florida. He is survived by a niece.

 

Sep, 2018
50

Angelyn Rocchio Kiernan ’50, of East Greenwich, R.I.; May 1. She worked for the State of Rhode Island before starting a family. She enjoyed traveling, reading, and power-walking. She is survived by two daughters; two sons; two daughters-in-law; two sons-in-law; nine grandchildren; four great-grandchildren; sisters Madelyn Rocchio Dee ’50 and Elena Rocchio ’52; longtime companion Vincent Cullen; and many nieces and nephews, including Laurel Rocchio ’78 and Nancy Dee ’82.
 

 

Sep, 2018
50

Ronald A. Kelly ’50, of New Canaan, Conn.; May 9. He was the owner of the Ford dealership Stamford Motors Inc. in Stamford, Conn., and he also owned a Nissan franchise in Stamford. He enjoyed playing golf and is survived by his wife, Linda, and a son.

 

Sep, 2018
50

Dean F. Clement ’50, of Santa Barbara, Calif.; Mar. 6. He worked for RCA and later was president of Gilbert Marking Systems in Los Angeles. In retirement he traded stocks, researched investment opportunities, and managed retirement accounts. He enjoyed reading, Big Band music, the symphony, and theater. He donated to numerous charities. He is survived by his wife, Renee.

 

Sep, 2018
50

George Chizinsky ’50, of Beverly, Mass.; Apr. 22, after a long illness. He was an inventor, entrepreneur, and businessman who traveled the world for his work. He had worked as an engineer at Solid State Products in Salem, Mass. and KEV Electronics Corp. in Wilmington, Mass., and was a senior staff engineer at Fairchild Corp. in South Portland, Me. He also managed sales and marketing for the Tylan Corp. in Peabody, Mass. and the Eaton Corp. in Danvers, Mass., and was senior vice president of marketing for Aera Corp. in Beverly. He had several patents registered with the U.S. Patent Office. He was a member of the American Chemical Society and Sigma Xi. He enjoyed walks on the beach and sailing. He is survived by his wife, Joyce; a daughter, and a granddaughter.

Sep, 2018
50

Theodore Brown ’50, of Jackson, N.H.; Mar. 11. He was a retired vice president of Amica Mutual Insurance Company. He hiked several trails in New Hampshire and was active with the New Hampshire Outdoor council. He is survived by three children, a daughter-in-law, and two grandchildren.

 

Sep, 2018
49

Jean E. Miller ’49, of Arlington, Vt.; May 21, of a stroke.  She taught English for seven years in the public high schools of Westbrook, Maine, and Marshfield, Mass., followed by two years at Mount Vernon Seminary in Washington, D.C. She went on to teach English and become assistant to the headmaster of the Masters School in New York. She was later dean of student personnel at Bennington College in Vermont, headmistress of St. Timothy’s School in Maryland, and headmistress of Vivian Webb Schools in Claremont, Calif. She served as director of development at Poly Prep Country Day School in New York and was chairman of the National Association of Independent Schools—the first woman to serve in this capacity—before retiring. Active in Pembroke affairs, she joined the Pembroke Center Associates Council in 1989 and served as chair from 2002-2004. She endowed the Edith Goldthwaite Miller Faculty Fellow Research Fund in 2002 for the Pembroke Center and was a 1998 Brown Bear recipient.  She is survived by two brothers.

 

Sep, 2018
49

Muriel Hendrick Krauss ’49, of Post Falls, Idaho; Mar. 5. She served in the U.S. Naval Reserve, then continued her studies in psychology and earned two master’s degrees. She enjoyed doing volunteer work, studying history, and traveling. She is survived by four daughters and a son.

 

Sep, 2018
49

Albert J. Jacobs ’49, of Boca Raton, Fla., formerly of Cranston, R.I.; May 27. After a brief career in engineering, he founded three fashion jewelry and findings import companies (Princess Fashions, Eastern Import Co., and Pegasus Import Co.) and served as president of each. He enjoyed jazz music, fishing, Asian art, home aquariums, and traveling. He is survived by a daughter, sons Bradley ’79 and Theodore ’84 MD, two daughters-in-law, a son-in-law, six grandchildren, two great-grandchildren, a niece, and two nephews.

 

Sep, 2018
49

Barbara Dinkel Dillon ’49, of Darien, Conn.; Mar. 28. She worked as an editorial assistant at the New Yorker magazine in Manhattan, while also doing some freelance writing. She sold her first story, “The Grand Champion Peanut Racer,” to Woman’s Day magazine at the age of 23. Over the course of her career, she authored nine children’s books, including A Mom by Magic, which was made into an NBC TV movie, A Mom for Christmas, produced by Walt Disney Productions in 1990. She spoke at several local schools about her writing and remained an avid reader of children’s literature and the New York Times Book Review. She enjoyed attending the Darien Playhouse and New York City theater. She also played tennis, golf, paddle tennis, and bridge. She volunteered in several organizations, taught pre-reading skills to underprivileged children in Stamford, Conn., and was a volunteer for 25 years at Person-to-Person in Darien. She is survived by three daughters and their spouses, eight grandchildren, three great-grandchildren, and a brother.

Sep, 2018
49

Edward A. Vincent ’49, of Springfield, Ohio; May 12, following a brief illness. He worked at Interstate Department Stores for 26 years before owning and operating the Downtown Specialty Store in Springfield for 14 years. He served on the Chamber of Commerce and was a member of the Downtown Merchants Assoc. He is survived by his wife, Carol; three children; five grandchildren; and 10 great-grandchildren.

 

Sep, 2018
49

Ronald S. Pritzker ’49, of Hyannis, Mass.; May 15. He worked in the family outerwear manufacturing business, A. Pritzker and Sons, and later in beer, wine, and liquor sales and distribution. He was active in civic life and served as president of the Oak Hill Park Neighborhood Assoc. and Temple Mishkan Tefila. He volunteered with the Barnstable (Mass.) police department and enjoyed acting and singing. He is survived by his wife, Avis; a daughter; a son; their spouses; and four grandchildren.

 

Sep, 2018
48

Richard A. Wise ’48, of Dover, Mass.; Apr. 28. He was employed as a patent examiner at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office in Washington, D.C. After returning to the New England area, he was employed with USM Corp., becoming general patent counsel. In 1971 he accepted the position as patent and trademark counsel of the Gillette Co. in Boston. He then became Of Council for Hamilton, Brook, Smith & Reynolds of Lexington, Mass. He was a World War II U.S. Army Air Corps veteran and life member of Norfolk Lodge AF&AM in Needham, Mass. He is survived by his wife, Geraldine; a granddaughter; and several nieces and nephews.

 

Sep, 2018
47

William E. Stone ’47, of Philadelphia, Pa.; May 7. He was a retired pastor who had served in several locations, including Connecticut, New Hampshire, Maryland, and Pennsylvania. He was a member of the 112th Field Artillery Assoc., the Military Chaplains Assoc., and the Retired Officers Assoc. of Philadelphia. He is survived by three children, three grandchildren, a great grandchild, and a brother.

 

Sep, 2018
45

Elaine Laudati Regine ’45, of Cranston, R.I.; May 2. She was a social worker for the State of Rhode Island. After raising a family, she obtained a teacher’s certificate from Rhode Island College and became a substitute teacher in the Providence and Cranston school systems. She enjoyed sports, specifically playing golf, and was a member of Metacomet Country Club, where she scored a hole in one in 1966. She is survived by six children and their spouses, including son Louis J. Regine III ’73.

 

Sep, 2018
45

Thomas J. Loftus ’45, of Nahant, Mass.; Apr. 22. He was a retired administrator of the Boston Public School system. After retiring from the school system he worked for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Registry of Deeds for 15 years. He was a World War II U.S. Navy veteran and a founding member of the Walsh Post American Legion in Dorchester. He enjoyed Boston politics and Boston sports. He is survived by a son, a daughter-in-law, two granddaughters, and two great-grandsons.

 

Sep, 2018
45

David E. Ferguson ’45, of Richmond, N.H., formerly of East Lyme, Conn.; Apr. 29. He was a retired senior engineer at Electric Boat in Groton, Conn. During World War II he served in the U.S. Navy and retired from the USNR in 1961 as a lieutenant. He is survived by two daughters, a son, a daughter-in-law, a son-in-law, four grandchildren, four great-grandchildren, and a sister.

 

Sep, 2018
45

Rozanne Karibian Arzoomanian ’45, ’62 MAT, of Cranston, R.I.; Apr. 30. She taught science at Hugh B. Bain Middle School in Cranston and was coprincipal of the Mourad Armenian School. She was a longtime member of St. Vartanantz Armenian Apostolic Church and is survived by a daughter, a son, and two siblings.

 

Sep, 2018
45

Henry E. Altenberg ’45, of Kittery, Me., formerly of West Hartford, Conn.; Apr. 25, of multiple myeloma. He was a retired psychiatrist. He served as a psychiatrist in the U.S. Air Force in Alaska from 1952 to 1954. Moving back to the East Coast, he practiced psychiatry for the next 30 years. In 1984 he moved to Kittery, married, and enjoyed traveling and sailing along the Maine coast. As a member of the American Holistic Medical Assoc., he was trained in advanced Reiki and, with his wife, codirected the Spruce Creek Holistic Center in Kittery, where they ran a support group for people with life-threatening illnesses. He authored Holistic Medicine, A Meeting of East and West. He also contributed to Doctors Look at Macrobiotics. He is survived by his wife, Jeanne; three daughters; a son; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; four step-children; four grandchildren; and five step-grandchildren.

 

Sep, 2018
44

Russel M. Geer ’44, of Gainesville, Ga.; May 22. He was the owner of an H&R Block for 40 years. He is survived by a daughter, a son-in-law, and two grandsons.

 

Sep, 2018
42

Ellen A. Hills ’42, of Skowhegan, Me.; May 3. She worked as a nurse, nurse educator, and private duty nurse. Later, after obtaining her teaching certificate, she taught first grade in North Reading, Mass. She continued to teach until her retirement in 1975. She was actively involved in protecting the environment and was the founder of Maine’s first green cemetery—Rainbow’s End, which was featured in a 2008 Classes profile in the January/February issue of BAM. She enjoyed knitting, needlepoint, rug hooking, quilting, embroidery, and traveling. She is survived by a daughter, two sons, two daughters-in-law, a son-in-law, 11 grandchildren, and two brothers.

Sep, 2018
42

Florence Northcott Cox ’42, of Vienna, Va., formerly of Cumberland, R.I.; May 15. She taught at Scott Elementary School in Warwick, R.I., for 19 years and owned Bay View Realty Co. in Jamestown, R.I. She was involved in many organizations in Rhode Island, including the Blackstone Valley Historical Society and Learning for Life. She was a member and Sunday school teacher of the Arnold Mills United Methodist Church in Cumberland. She is survived by three daughters, a son, 10 grandchildren, and six great-grandchildren.

 

Sep, 2018
41

Celeste F. Griffin ’41, of East Providence, R.I.; Apr. 30. A former lieutenant in the WAVES, she later worked as an admissions officer at Brown. She retired in 1985. She is survived by a sister and nieces and nephews.

 

Sep, 2018
39

Edward H. Ziegler Jr. ’39, of Providence; July 10, 2017. He was a retired dentist. During World War II he served as a naval officer in the dental corps. He enjoyed flying, scuba diving, camping, creating stained glass pieces, and beekeeping. He is survived by a daughter, a son, a daughter-in-law, a son-in-law, and six grandchildren.

 

Jul, 2018
GS

Reva Angel Stern ’89 AM, of Providence; Feb. 3. She was a retired instructor in continuing education at RISD andmember of Temple Emanu-El. She is survived by daughters Karen Stern Hammarstrom ’88 and Lisa Stern ’89; sons Joel ’91 MD and Alan ’94; a son-in-law; four grandchildren; and a brother.

 

Jul, 2018
GS

Adam Irgon ’84 ScM, of Princeton, N.J.; Jan. 19. He worked at Telcordia before founding STS Consulting in East Brunswick, N.J. He enjoyed gardening and philanthropic work. He is survived by his wife, Irina; a daughter, Marina Gu ’11; a son; his mother; and two sisters.

 

Jul, 2018
GS

Archie J. Powell ’74 AM, of Roxbury, Mass.; Jan. 30. He worked for the Rhode Island Department of Education until 1981, when he took a position at Brown to become minority affairs officer in the division of biology and medicine. He left Brown to be associate dean of students for minority affairs at Albany Medical College (New York) and later was associate director of admissions at Boston Univ. He was a gifted musician and taught piano, organ, and voice in the Boston area; he performed with the Morehouse College Glee Club and also directed the Boston Orchestra and Chorale choir. In addition to his many memberships, he belonged to the American Guild of Organists and the National Association of Minority Medical Educators, and sat on several boards. He was inducted into the Distinguished Service Chapter of Phi Beta Sigma in 2013. He is survived by two sisters, a half-sister, and a nephew.

 

Jul, 2018
GS

Joan Pollins Feldman ’68 MAT, of Boca Raton, Fla., formerly of Pawtucket, R.I. She was an art teacher at Shea High School in Pawtucket for more than 20 years. She was a member of the Providence Art Club, the Boca Raton Watercolor Society, and the Artist Guild of Boca Raton. She is survived by two daughters; a son-in-law; and a granddaughter.
 

 

Jul, 2018
GS

Frank L. Ingenito ’67 PhD, of Washington, D.C.; Feb. 14, from progressive supranuclear palsy. He was a scientist at the Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, D.C. He is survived by his wife, Rosalie, and several cousins.
 

 

Jul, 2018
GS

David L. Berube ’65 MAT, of Bluffton, S.C.; Feb. 7, of bone cancer. He was a retired high school history teacher. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army and enjoyed playing tennis. He is survived by his wife, Janice: a daughter; two sons; two granddaughters; a sister; and a brother.
 

 

Jul, 2018
GS

Richard A. Derrig ’64 ScM, ’70 PhD, of Providence; Feb. 8. He was president of OPAL Consulting LLC, which he established in 2004 to provide research and support to the property-casualty insurance industry. Prior to forming OPAL, he was a senior vice president at the Automobile Insurers Bureau and a vice president at the Insurance Fraud Bureaus, both of Massachusetts. He taught graduate and undergraduate mathematics at Villanova Univ. and Wheaton College. He wrote several prize-winning papers and lectured to professional groups, law enforcement personnel, and U.S. and foreign trade organizations. He enjoyed traveling with his wife and attending Brown football, basketball, and hockey games. He is survived by his wife, Nancy; a daughter; a son; a son-in-law; and a granddaughter, Tess Rossi ’20.

 

Jul, 2018
GS

John H. Abel ’64 MAT, ’66 PhD, of Bethlehem, Pa.; Feb. 27. He was a professor of cell and molecular biology and chairman of the biology department at Lehigh Univ. He also held professorships at New York Medical College, Colorado State Univ., the Univ. of Bonn in Germany and the Univ. of Tennessee. He had been involved with NASA early in his career, especially with the Gemini program. He enjoyed golf, photography, and traveling. He is survived by a daughter, two sons, two daughters-in-law, a son-in-law, five grandchildren, and three great-grandchildren.

 

Jul, 2018
GS

Charles E. Dyke ’62 AM, ’66 PhD, of Plumstead, Pa.; Feb. 21. He taught philosophy at Temple Univ. for 50 years. Some of his publications include The Evolutionary Dynamics of Complex Systems and How Nature Speaks: The Dynamics of the Human Ecological Condition. For two years he taught at Temple’s campus in Rome, Italy. In retirement he turned to sculpture and exhibited his work at the Tinicum Arts Festival. He also enjoyed gardening. He is survived by his wife, Linda; two sons and their spouses; and three grandchildren.

 

Jul, 2018
GS

Earl W. O’Dell ’58 ScM, of Morris Plains, N.J.; Mar. 3. He was a research physicist at Allied-Signal in Morristown and a World War II veteran of the U.S. Army Air Corps. He is survived by a daughter, two sons, two daughters-in-law, a son-in-law, and five grandchildren.
 

 

Jul, 2018
GS

Joseph T. Mullhaupt ’58 PhD, of Warwick, N.Y.; Feb. 21. He was a research chemist employed with Linde Division of Union Carbide in Tonawanda, N.Y. During his more than 45-year career with Linde, he coauthored at least six technical papers and was an inventor on nine patents. He was active in his church, serving as a cantor. He is survived by a daughter, four sons, three daughters-in-law, and seven grandchildren.

 

Jul, 2018
GS

Robert D. Hall ’58 AM, ’60 PhD, of Sudbury, Mass.; Jan. 24. He was a staff scientist in the neurosciences research program at MIT, later at the Worcester Foundation, and retired from Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary. He became an avid runner in his 50s and joined the Concord Runners. He ran several Boston Marathons and the annual Mt. Washington road race into his 80s. He served on numerous boards and enjoyed traveling, the symphony, and the theater. He is survived by his wife, Sandra; a daughter; two sons; and four grandchildren.

 

Jul, 2018
GS

Astrid Bottis Kromayer ’51 AM, of Bethlehem, Pa.; Feb. 19. She began teaching Spanish at Lehigh Univ. in 1951. From 1958 to 1963 she taught at Moravian Academy and later at Moravian College (both in Bethlehem), teaching both Spanish and French courses. She retired in 1992 as a recipient of the Lindback Foundation Award for distinguished teaching. She enjoyed animals and helping at the nonprofit Animals in Distress. She is survived by her husband, Peter; two daughters; and their spouses.

 

Jul, 2018
GS

Aldo S. Lehmann ’41 PhD, of Fallbrook, Calif.; Nov. 24. He joined Shell Development Co. as a chemist in 1946 and held several managerial positions in the company, retiring after 31 years. During World War II he worked for the U.S. Department of the Navy on special assignments, including the Manhattan Project. An avid traveler, he visited numerous countries and every state in the United States. He was a member of the American Chemical Society, American Petroleum Institute, Alpha Chi Sigma, Phi Beta Kappa, and Sigma XI. He enjoyed camping, hiking, fly-fishing, hunting, and horseback riding. He is survived by two sons, two grandchildren, and seven great-grandchildren.

 

Jul, 2018
91

Peter G. Smas ’91, of Austin, Tex.; Feb. 6. He was a research specialist in the life/health actuarial office at the Texas Department of Insurance. Previously he worked as an insurance service specialist at Nationwide Insurance in the Austin area. He enjoyed hiking, kayaking, biking, and reading. He is survived by his mother and his sister.
 

 

Jul, 2018
78

Elisabeth H. Elkind ’78, of Brooklyn, N.Y.; Mar. 13, of cancer. After receiving a master’s degree in library science from Simmons College and a second master’s in American history from NYU, she worked as an archivist at the New York Public Library and Harvard University’s Widener and Houghton Libraries. She is survived by her husband, David Alquist; two daughters; a brother; and nieces and nephews.

 

Jul, 2018
75

John R. Monsees ’75, of Rancho Santa Fe, Calif.; Jan. 27, of brain cancer. He was a CPA with Deloitte Haskins & Sells and then became a CFO of a regional home builder. He was an avid hiker and enjoyed swimming, skiing, cycling, and running. He participated in numerous marathons and triathlons. He is survived by his wife, LaDonna; a stepdaughter; a stepson; and a sister.
 

 

Jul, 2018
72

H. Carleton Clinch ’72, of Ridgewood, N.J.; Feb. 9. He was an assistant prosecutor for Bergen County in Hackensack, N.J., and then left to join his father in private law practice. He was chairman of the American Red Cross and involved in several community organizations. He is survived by his wife, Janel; two children; three grandchildren; and a sister.

 

Jul, 2018
70

Philip F. Smith ’70, of San Rafael, Calif.; Feb. 4, of complications of duodenum cancer. He was a computer programmer at Bank of America, Blue Cross, and Federal Reserve Bank before retiring. He was an active member of the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Marin for more than 25 years and sang in a choir. He enjoyed playing guitar and cello, as well as reading, learning German, studying astronomy, playing bridge, playing golf, traveling, gardening, hiking, and cross-country skiing. He is survived by his wife, Lori; two daughters; a son-in-law; and a grandchild.

 

Jul, 2018
69

Edward J. Glasband ’69, of Bloomfield, Conn.; Jan. 28. He was an entrepreneur with a career spanning the packaging industry, real estate development, and the promotional products industry, and was a medical manager/consultant. He also taught real estate finance at the Univ. of Hartford. He was a volunteer at Connecticut Children’s Medical Center and at Gifts of Love, in Avon, Conn. He enjoyed traveling, saw all seven continents, and visited more than 70 countries. He especially enjoyed safaris.
 

 

Jul, 2018
68

David A. Hardy ’68, of Easton, Mass.; Dec. 2, of ALS. He was a former information services manager at New England Medical Center Hospitals. He enjoyed gardening and listening to all kinds of music. He is survived by his wife, Bobbi; two children; and two grandchildren.
 

 

Jul, 2018
67

William G. O’Donnell ’67, of Chicago; Dec. 30. He worked at Lind-Waldock in Chicago, where he became president and opened the London office in 1990s. He is survived by his wife, Judith; a sister; a brother; and 10 nieces and nephews.

 

Jul, 2018
66

Fruma Strauss Efreom ’66, of Warwick, R.I.; Feb. 17. She worked as a program and capital budget specialist for the Rhode Island Department of Education, was a public school teacher, and later was a grant writer for Family Service of Rhode Island. She is survived by her husband, Binyamin Efreom ’66 MAT; two daughters; and a son.

 

Jul, 2018
65

Robert V. Howland ’65, of San Antonio, Tex.; Feb. 5, after a short illness. He had a career in banking, hospital administration, and higher education administration from 1968 to 1990. From 1990 to 2006 he did tax preparation and was an IRS agent. A devoted baseball fan, he studied baseball statistics and attended games throughout the country, including spring training in Florida and Arizona. He had served in the U.S. Air Force and additionally with the Rhode Island and New York Air National Guard. He volunteered and was active in professional associations. He is survived by his wife, Kristine; two sons; two grandchildren; a brother; a sister-in-law; and several nieces and nephews.

 

Jul, 2018
64

John J. Theodoros ’64, of Littleton, Mass.; Feb. 21, of complications from kidney disease.

 

Jul, 2018
63

Susan Humphreys Schappell ’63, of Holmdel, N.J.; Jan. 20. She worked at Bell Laboratories in Whippany, N.J., for many years and retired in 2001 as district manager at AT&T in Piscataway, N.J. She is survived by two daughters, four grandchildren, two sisters, and several nieces and nephews.

 

Jul, 2018
62

Anne Jacobson Schutte ’62, of Chicago; Feb. 26, from a cerebral hemorrhage. She was a history professor at Lawrence Univ. (Wisc.) until joining the faculty at the Univ. of Virginia in 1992. She spent 14 years at UVA and retired in 2006. In retirement she lived in Venice, Italy, returning to the United States in 2016. A recipient of Fulbright and National Endowment for the Humanities fellowships, she held several administrative positions during her career, including director of the Distinguished Majors program at UVA and director of the Associated College of the Midwest’s Florence Program while at Lawrence Univ. She authored more than 80 scholarly articles and five books, including Pier Paolo Vergerio: The Making of an Italian Reformer, which was honored by the Society for Italian Historical Studies with its Howard R. Marraro Prize. She was working on her sixth book at the time of her death. In 2012 she was awarded the Bodo Nischan Award for scholarship, service, and civility by the Society for Reformation Research. Phi Beta Kappa. She is survived by a brother.

 

Jul, 2018
62

Michael S. Saper ’62, of Wilmette, Ill.; Feb. 23, after a long illness. He was a retired attorney, a former class president, and active in alumni affairs. He is survived by his wife, Marcia; a daughter; and a sister.

 

Jul, 2018
62

Robert L. Dillmeier ’62, of Hobe Sound, Fla., formerly of Garden City, N.Y.; Feb. 6. He began his career at Paine Webber as an investment banker. From there he cofounded Campbell and Dillmeier, a real estate investment trust consulting firm. He retired as president and CEO of Dillmeier Enterprises. He served on several boards over the years. At Brown he was president of Delta Kappa Epsilon and played lacrosse. An accomplished seaman, he was commodore of Loblolly Bay Yacht Club in Hobe Sound and enjoyed spending time on the water with his family. He is survived by his wife, Margaret; three children and their spouses; and eight grandchildren.

 

Jul, 2018
62

Christopher V. Brown ’62, of Cicero, Ind.; Jan. 12. He was a self-employed attorney for 50 years. He was president of Festival Music Society (known now as the Indianapolis Early Music Festival), a board member of Broad Shoulders Productions, and a member of Phi Beta Kappa and Lambda Phi. He is survived by his wife, Sylvia; three daughters; and a brother.

 

Jul, 2018
61

Julia Baltzell O’Malley ’61, of Weymouth, Mass., formerly of Bay Shore and Huntington Station, N.Y.; Feb. 11, of pneumonia. She worked as a purchaser for Litton Industries, Eaton, and other instrument manufacturers until her retirement in 2000. She enjoyed classical music, played the piano, and supported animal welfare organizations. She is survived by two sons, including Mark ’87; two granddaughters; and two sisters.

 

Jul, 2018
61

Robert B. Kirchberger ’61, of The Villages, Fla., formerly of Rockville, Conn.; Feb. 18. He cofounded Videoplay Industries, in Vernon, Conn., which he ran for 30 years. He enjoyed playing golf. He is survived by his wife, Vonda; three children, including Eric ’92; a son-in-law; five grandchildren; a sister; a brother; and seven nieces and nephews.
 

 

Jul, 2018
61

Howard M. Bromage Jr. ’61, of Enfield, Conn.; Mar. 10. He founded and ran Bromage-Wilcox Insurance Agency in Enfield for 40 years. An avid sportsman, he played varsity baseball at Brown and had a lifelong softball career in the Enfield league with the AMVETS team and in the senior leagues of Vernon and Wallingford, Conn., and Ludlow and Cape Cod, Mass. He was honored for his many athletic accomplishments and years of service to the town of Enfield by being inducted into the Enfield Athletic Hall of Fame in 1999. He is survived by his wife, Lois; a daughter; three sons; two daughters-in-law; six grandchildren; a brother; and six nephews.

 

Jul, 2018
61

Toyo Uyeyama Biddle ’61, of Summit, N.J; Feb. 12. She worked in the federal government to advance civil rights for disadvantaged students, minorities, and women, including four years as director of Asian American Affairs in the former Department of Health, Education & Welfare. For 20 years she worked to improve and manage the Department of Health & Human Services refugee resettlement and immigrant services, focusing on helping the Hmong population. She was instrumental in establishing One-Stop Centers to provide support services. After retiring from the federal government, she maintained an active interest in policy and politics until her death. She is survived by three daughters, including Ann Biddle ’83; two sons-in-law; five grandchildren; and a brother.

 

Jul, 2018
60

James C. Butler III ’60, of Greenbelt, Md., formerly of Syracuse, N.Y.; Feb. 9, after a brief illness. He was president of the family business, Syracuse Pottery, for many years prior to moving to Maryland. He enjoyed fishing, bowling, and boating. He is survived by a daughter, Janet Butler Berry ’91; a son; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; and five grandchildren.

 

Jul, 2018
58

Richard E. Neal ’58, of Andover, Mass.; Jan. 20, of cancer. Following 40 years in education, he retired in 1998 as superintendent of the Andover Public School System. In 1989, he was named Middle Level Administrator of the Year for Massachusetts. An avid sports fan, he coached with Andover Little League and was founder of the Andover Hockey Assoc., where he also coached the Andover Bantam hockey team. In retirement, he worked for another 17 years at the TD Garden in Boston as a guest relations supervisor and was a supervisor for the National Assessment of Educational Progress. He is survived by two daughters, a son, a daughter-in-law, two sons-in-law, six grandchildren, a brother, and a sister-in-law.

 

Jul, 2018
58

James W. Hanner ’58, ’62 MAT, of Amherst, Mass., formerly of Arcadia, Calif.; Feb. 8. He was a retired financial consultant. He enjoyed singing in the Valley Light Opera and the Hampshire Choral Society. He also enjoyed watching the Boston Red Sox. He is survived by his wife, Martha; a daughter; a sister-in-law; and a brother-in-law.

 

Jul, 2018
57

Joyce Williams Warren ’57, ’60 AM, of Roslyn Heights, N.Y.; Dec. 17. She was a professor of English and director of Women’s Studies at Queens College in New York. She was the author of The American Narcissus: Individualism and Women in Nineteenth-Century American Fiction; Fanny Fern: An Independent Woman; and Women, Money, and the Law: Nineteenth-Century Fiction, Gender, and the Courts, as well as the children’s book A Mouse to Be Free. She served on her local library board and was active in environmental and community organizations. She is survived by her husband, Frank ’57 AM, ’62 PhD; four children, including Catherine Warren ’88, and their spouses, including Anthony R. Loumis ’99; and five grandchildren.

 

Jul, 2018
57

Carlton V. Phillips ’57, of Scottsdale, Ariz.; Feb. 8. He was an officer in the Korean War and retired from the Reserves in 1984 as a colonel after service in the Aviation Systems Command. At the age of 80, he continued to give civil air patrol cadets sailplane orientation rides. He founded an aviation business and later a regional investment banking firm. He was active in his church and was a member of Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War and the Mayflower Society and chapter president of the Sons of the American Revolution. He is survived by four daughters, three sons, 10 grandchildren, three great-grandchildren, and a sister.

 

Jul, 2018
57

Thaddeus S. Newell III ’57, of Rochester, N.Y.; Jan. 20. He worked more than 30 years at Lincoln Rochester Trust Co., retiring in 1990 as a senior vice president. He volunteered for the United Way of Greater Rochester and chaired the Rochester Monroe County Chapter of the American Red Cross, from which he was awarded the Clara Barton Award. He enjoyed fishing and playing golf and was a member of several golf clubs. He is survived by his wife, Sherley; three sons; six grandchildren; brother Frances D. Newell ’58; a niece; and a nephew.

 

Jul, 2018
57

Walter L. McGarry Jr. ’57, of Cranston, R.I.; Feb. 22. He had a 43-year career in human resource management positions. He enjoyed volunteer work and served on the board of Access Point of Rhode Island. He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth; a brother; a sister-in-law; and nieces and nephews.
 

 

Jul, 2018
57

Marc M. McClelland ’57, of San Antonio, Tex.; Mar. 4. After serving in the U.S. Air Force, he joined United Airlines as a pilot. He returned to the military and had a 33-year career before retiring in 1987 as vice commander. He was a veteran of the Vietnam War. He is survived by his wife, Celia; three sons; a daughter-in-law; eight grandchildren; eight great-grandchildren; a half-sister; and a half-brother.

 

Jul, 2018
56

Daniel H. Morrissey Jr. ’56, of Chevy Chase, Md.; Jan. 31, after a long illness. He was retired from the U.S. Office of Education and was a U.S. Coast Guard veteran of the Korean War. He is survived by his wife, Barbara; a daughter; two sons; and eight grandchildren.

 

Jul, 2018
56

Edward P. Kelly ’56, of Aberdeen, Miss., formerly of Chicago; Dec. 22. After working briefly as an assistant district attorney for New York, he moved to Chicago and worked for Apollo Savings and Loan. He was promoted to president in 1962. At that time, he was the youngest member of the U.S. Savings and Loan League Legislative Committee and the Illinois Savings and Loan League Advisory Board and he was subsequently elected to membership in the Young Presidents’ Organization. He was an accomplished public speaker involved in several political campaigns and instrumental in developing the Plaza of the Americas flags on Michigan Ave. He enjoyed traveling. He is survived by his wife, Susie; three daughters; a son; and seven grandchildren.

 

Jul, 2018
56

Joseph M. Daley Jr. ’56, of Fort Worth, Tex.; Feb. 18. He was president of J.M. Daley & Associates, an equity investment firm. He had been director of investor relations at Kalan Gold Corp. He earned a master’s degree in economic development and Japanese labor relations from Sophia Univ. in Tokyo while working there for the Japanese subsidiary of an American specialty chemical company. His career included achievements in international enterprise management, investments, adult education, technology, and public service. He lectured at more than 125 technology conferences and authored numerous economic development studies. He served in the U.S. Navy and retired as a commander, U.S. Naval Reserve. He also was a director of the Japan America Society. He is survived by his wife, Grace Wessels Daley ’59; four children and their spouses; and nine grandchildren.

 

Jul, 2018
56

Bruce N. Abbott ’56, of Oxford, Me., formerly of West Springfield, Mass.; Dec. 23. In West Springfield, he began his career working at IBM, transitioned into insurance, and retired after 31 years with Travelers Insurance in Hartford, Conn., as a data analyst. He was a longtime member, Sunday school teacher, and choir member at Mittineague Congregational Church in West Springfield. After moving to Oxford, he joined Oxford Congregational Church and served as treasurer. He enjoyed playing cribbage and was an avid Boston sports fan. He is survived by his wife, Barbara; a daughter; three sons; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; 16 grandchildren; seven great-grandchildren; two brothers, including Douglas ’61; and two sisters-in-law.

 

Jul, 2018
55

Leslie Travis Wendel ’55, of Newtown, Pa., formerly of Brooklyn, Conn., and Providence; Jan. 1. She was a reporter for the Hartford Courant from 1971 to 1978, and through 1995 she was a freelance journalist whose articles had appeared in the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times, the San Francisco Examiner, and the Chicago Sun Times. From 1978 to 1986 she was director of communications and donor relations at Brown. She then spent five years as managing director of Wendel Associates before returning to Brown in 1991 as coordinator of the Friends of the Library. She was editor of Special Collections at Brown University: A History and Guide and The Carberry Cookbook. In 1999 she was the recipient of Brown’s William Williams Award for distinguished contributions to the Brown University Library. She was a longtime board member of the Eastern Shore Land Conservancy and served two terms as president. In 1990 she spent time in Argentina weighing, measuring, and banding penguins as part of a research project of the New York Zoological Society. She was a member of the Women’s League of Washington College and a former Regent of Old Kent Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution. She is survived by two sons, including Andrew ’85; a grandson; and two brothers.

Jul, 2018
55

W. Kent Montgomery ’55, of Oakham, Mass.; Feb. 19. He was the vice president of human resources at Memorial Hospital in Worcester, Mass., and later a human resource consultant with Montgomery Associates in Oakham prior to his retirement. He was a veteran of the U.S. Navy and is survived by his wife, Elizabeth; four sons; two daughters-in-law; nine grandchildren; and a great-grandchild.

 

Jul, 2018
55

Gerold N. Borodach ’55, of New York City; Feb. 15. He was a retired physician and anesthesiologist. He was a member of the American Medical Assoc. and the American Society of Anesthesiologists. He is survived by his wife, Ardell Kabalkin ’57; a daughter; sons Andrew ’93 and Samuel ’87; and a son-in-law, Kenneth Elmore ’85.
 

 

Jul, 2018
55

Vaino A. Ahonen ’55, of Ho-Ho-Kus, N.J.; Feb. 4. He had a career in international banking. He retired in 1991 as senior vice president at Summit Bank, which later became Bank of America. He was active in the New Jersey Trade Council, where he served as vice chairman, director, and treasurer. He was also a trustee of the Bergen Philharmonic and the Community Resource Council. He is survived by nieces and nephews.

 

Jul, 2018
54

Charles D. Lake ’54, of Marion, Mass.; Feb. 16. A retired clergyman. After Brown, he went on to earn a Bachelor of Divinity degree from Yale and a master’s in Christian Theology and PhD in philosophical theology from the Univ. of Chicago before being ordained to the Christian ministry by the First Baptist Church of Melrose, Mass., in 1957. He served as an assistant in the First Baptist Church in America in Providence, then on the faculty of Stevens College in Columbia, Mo., followed by the position of chaplain and dean of Stevens College for 11 years. In 1976 he moved to Marion to become the executive director of the Massachusetts Commission for United Ministries in Higher Education and he later went into semiretirement as interim pastor of the South Baptist Church of New Bedford, Mass., and, finally, preaching at First Congregational Church of Marion. He is survived by his wife, Jeanne; two daughters; a son; a daughter-in-law; and four grandchildren.

 

Jul, 2018
54

Richard S. Weinstein ’54, of Los Angeles, formerly of New York City; Feb. 24, from complications of Parkinson’s. He worked for architects I.M. Pei and Edward Larrabee Barnes and spent a year at the American Academy in Rome as a winner of the Rome Prize before joining the mayoral administration in 1966 as an advisor of the new Urban Design Group within the Department of City Planning in New York City. He helped plan and oversee the expansion of the Museum of Modern Art in the mid-1970s, a project that hinged on the transfer of air rights, and he spent six years working on redevelopment along 42nd Street in Manhattan and saving the South Street Seaport. In 1985 he moved to Los Angeles to become dean of the architecture and urban planning school at UCLA. From 1995 to 2008 he was a professor of architecture and urban design. He founded the Lewis Center for Regional Policy Studies at UCLA, served on the jury for the Walt Disney Concert Hall, and was coadministrator of the architectural selection process for the new Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels in Los Angeles. He immersed himself in political debates over architecture and planning in Los Angeles. He is survived by his wife, Edina; two sons; and two granddaughters.

Jul, 2018
53

Ralph L. Meyer ’53, of Southington, Conn.; Jan. 26. He was the owner of the former Vaill & Meyer Paint Store in New Britain, Conn., and later in Berlin, Conn. He was a member of the Berlin Lions Club and former member of the Berlin Chamber of Commerce. He enjoyed playing cards and reading, especially history. He is survived by his wife, Dottie; three children and their spouses; five grandchildren; five great-grandchildren; and several nieces and nephews.

 

Jul, 2018
53

John M. McIsaac Jr. ’53, of Easton, Md., formerly of Simsbury, Conn.; Jan. 21. After graduating, he received a commission in the U.S. Navy and served on active duty for six years, followed by 16 years in the naval reserve. From 1959 to 1991 he worked as an engineer and manager for United Technologies in Windsor Locks, Conn. He was an active volunteer in many community programs and enjoyed traveling the world, gardening, woodworking, photography, reading, and sailing. He is survived by his wife, Patricia; a daughter; two sons, including Scott ’86; five grandchildren; and a great-granddaughter.

 

Jul, 2018
53

Robert B. Jones ’53, of Sandy Hook, Conn.; Jan. 23. He was an insurance underwriter and had worked at Intercontinental Life Insurance, Acacia Mutual Life, Worcester State Mutual Life Insurance Co., Phoenix Mutual Life Insurance Co., and Boston Mutual Life Insurance Co. He was a Korean War U.S. Army veteran and enjoyed skiing, tennis, and working out at the gym. He is survived by three sons, two daughters-in-law, and four grandchildren.

 

Jul, 2018
53

James H.P. Hamilton ’53, of Lambertville, N.J.; Feb. 2, from complications of diabetes. In 1956, following service in the U.S. Army, he founded Design Associates, a scenic design and set-building studio, from which he produced numerous Broadway shows. He later taught theater production at NYU and Brandeis Univ. In the early 1980s he opened the Jim Hamilton & Co. architectural design studio, designing restaurants, homes, and commercial projects. In 1979 he designed a master plan for Lambertville’s commercial district and in 1988 opened his own restaurant, Hamilton’s Grill Room, with his daughter. He helped to create the Shad Fest annual event celebrating the federal Clean Water Act and on Sept. 17, 2005, the State of New Jersey and City of Lambertville declared it Jim Hamilton Day. He also enjoyed cooking and taught cooking classes in a local prison. He is survived by his wife, Judy; two daughters; a son; two stepchildren; seven grandchildren; a brother; and nieces and nephews.
 

 

Jul, 2018
53

Kenneth R. Allen ’53, of Pensacola, Fla., formerly of Minneapolis; Jan. 21. After serving in the naval aviation training program and earning his wings, he then served the country both on active and reserve duty and retired as a lieutenant colonel out of the reserve unit at Minneapolis-Saint Paul International Airport. After a brief stint working at Northwest Airlines, he changed careers and became a stockbroker at Paine Webber Jackson and Curtis in Minneapolis. He retired in 1999. He enjoyed playing golf, fishing, and photographing wildlife. He is survived by his wife, Jane; four children; six grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren.

 

Jul, 2018
52

James F. Ross ’52, of Boxford, Mass.; Feb. 11. After serving in the U.S. Navy pilot program during World War II, he joined United Airlines as a pilot, then as captain, and retired after more than 32 years of service. An entrepreneur, he invested in Graves Skis but also worked from the ground up in the company. Upon retiring, he and a partner built and restored antique World War II era planes, and he was instrumental in developing and building plane hangars for Lawrence Municipal Airport in North Andover, Mass. He was a member of the North Andover Hangar Assoc. He is survived by his wife, Barbara; two daughters; two sons; a daughter-in-law; nine grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren.

 

Jul, 2018
52

Martin E. Felder ’52, of Carlsbad, Calif., formerly of Providence; Dec. 31. A general surgeon, he started a private practice in Providence in 1963 and was instrumental in the development of Brown’s medical school. He was chief of general surgery at Miriam Hospital and was a member of numerous medical societies, including the New England Surgical Society. He retired in 2003 with emeritus professor status. He was a Silver Life Master in duplicate bridge, collected fine wines, and enjoyed playing golf. He is survived by his wife, Velma; two sons; four grandchildren; and a sister.

 

Jul, 2018
52

Howard D. Blank ’52, of Scarsdale, N.Y.; Feb. 2. He was a former assistant district attorney in Manhattan and founder and CEO of National Industrial Services. He enjoyed watching Duke basketball games with his sons, who were all Duke alumni; playing tennis; and reading. He is survived by his wife, Felice; three sons and their spouses; and seven grandchildren.

 

Jul, 2018
51

Leonard G. Tubbs Jr. ’51, of New Orleans; Jan. 20. He had a lifelong career in the marine insurance industry working with the Mariner’s Club of the Port of New Orleans and the Home Insurance Co. in New York, and as a vice president of Ferd. Marks-Smither & Co. in New Orleans. He was a charter and founding member of the Mariners Club of the Port of New Orleans and member of the New Orleans Board of Trade and the Southern Yacht Club. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army and enjoyed birding and bird photography. He is survived by four sons; three stepdaughters, including Lucinda Flowers ’77; 13 grandchildren; and seven great-grandchildren.

 

Jul, 2018
51

Edward G. Tefft ’51, of Royersford, Pa.; Jan. 30. He worked his entire 38-year career as an electrical engineer with General Electric, primarily in New York. He was an active member of Sacred Heart Church in Royersford and volunteered with several committees and organizations. He enjoyed sketching and painting. He is survived by his wife, Mary Anne; four children; seven grandchildren; a step-granddaughter; and five great-grandchildren.

 

Jul, 2018
51

Shirley Nagle Holmes ’51, of Barrington, R.I., formerly of Briarcliff Manor and Ossining, N.Y.; Jan. 19. She was a real estate agent for more than 40 years both in Westchester County, N.Y., and for Coleman Real Estate and Residential Properties of Barrington. She retired in 2012. She enjoyed traveling and playing tennis and bridge. She is survived by daughters Kristin Holmes-Linder ’76, Holly Holmes ’77, and Marnie Fuller Holmes Moody ’79; four grandchildren; and a brother.

 

Jul, 2018
51

Perry S. Herst ’51, of Rancho Santa Fe, Calif.; Feb. 6. He began his career in real estate at Arthur Rubloff & Co. before moving to Tishman Realty and Construction Co. in 1964. In 1968 he purchased Tishman Realty and Construction Co., which was later known as Tishman West Companies. It was eventually sold to an affiliate of American Express. He was involved in many philanthropic and charitable endeavors over the years, including serving on several boards. He was a recipient of the Humanitarian Award from the National Conference of Christians and Jews, and of the Civic Achievement Award from the American Jewish Committee. At Brown he was captain of the tennis team and a member of Zeta Psi. He was an avid outdoorsman and traveled around the world on fishing and hunting excursions. He is survived by his wife, Angela; son Perry III ’86; a stepdaughter; a stepson; six grandchildren; a sister; and nieces and nephews, including John S. Stamler Jr. ’98.

 

Jul, 2018
50

Bruce B. Chick ’50, ’53 ScM, of Rumford, R.I., and West Dennis, Mass.; Mar. 9 of cancer.While working towards his master’s degree at Brown, he worked in the metals research laboratory and was appointed assistant director of the lab in 1953. This led to a career in ultrasonic testing and the formation of two companies; Matec Inc., where he was president until it was sold in 1983, and RITEC Inc. in Warwick, R.I., where he was chairman. He wrote or cowrote numerous papers related to the specialized field of ultrasonic measurements and was coauthor of the text book Ultrasonic Methods in Solid State Physics. He held two patents for ultrasonic instruments. While at Brown as an undergrad, he was an announcer for WBRU for four years and after graduating became a faculty advisor and later served as president of the advisory board until 1983. He was a member of many organizations, including the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the American Society of Nondestructive Testing, The East Providence Historical Society, the East Providence Development Commission, and Sigma Xi. In 2015 he and his wife were elected copresidents of the Brown Class of 1950. Additionally, he was a senior warden at the Church of St. Michael and All Angels in Rumford. He is survived by his wife, Caroline Decatur Chick ’50; daughters Deborah Chick Burke ’77 and Nancy Chick Hyde ’80; and six grandchildren, including Nathan Hyde ’17 and Sara Hyde ’17.

Jul, 2018
50

Bennett Patrick ’50, of Queensbury, N.Y.; Jan. 1. He purchased a small wholesale tobacco company that he ran until the early 1990s, subsequently founding and running Patrick’s Food Service, which was a food and vending service in Glens Falls, N.Y., until it was sold in 1995. He was an avid skier, tennis player, bicycle rider, rower, and racquetball player. He skied until he was 84 years old. He also enjoyed traveling, especially to Europe and Israel. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army and is survived by a daughter, a son, four grandchildren, four great-grandchildren; and two brothers.

 

Jul, 2018
49

Paul F. Hood ’49, of Salt Lake City, Utah; Mar. 17. After serving in the U.S. Navy, he lived and worked in various places, including jobs in the financial, pension, retirement areas with Aetna Life & Casualty, Equitable Life, Marsh & McLennan, Merrill Lynch, Watson Wyatt & Co., and Rhode Island Hospital Trust National Bank. He was listed in Who’s Who in Finance and Industry and enjoyed reading about the Civil War, watching golf, and playing tennis. He is survived by a daughter, Tracy Hood Golden ’85; a son; a daughter-in-law; four grandchildren; and a brother, Ralph ’57.

 

Jul, 2018
49

William S. Capozzoli ’49, of Ellicott City, Md., formerly of Old Saybrook, Conn.; Jan. 26. He was a retired sales manager for Exide Battery and a U.S. Army World War II veteran. He is survived by his wife, Sally; three stepdaughters; and two nephews.

 

Jul, 2018
49

Constantine E. Anagnostopoulos ’49, of Bloomfield Hills, Mich., formerly of St. Louis; Jan. 20, after a brief illness. He joined Monsanto Company in 1952 as a research chemist. In 1954 he transferred to the organic chemicals division in St. Louis and was appointed a Monsanto Fellow in 1957. He served as vice president of Monsanto and vice chairman of its Corporate Development and Growth Committee and later was president and CEO of its Europe, Africa, and Middle East division. He retired from Monsanto in 1987 and began a second career as managing director of Gateway Ventures, headquartered in St. Louis. He was the author of numerous papers on technological entrepreneurship and corporate venture capital and, over the course of his career, developed several patents related to organic and polymer chemistry. He served on the Presidential Council on Innovation, the Industrial Research Institute, the National Inventors Council, and the European Government Business Council. He enjoyed watercolor painting and writing poetry. He is survived by a son, Paul ’74; a daughter-in-law; and two grandchildren.

 

Jul, 2018
48

Domenic A. Vavala ’48, of Johnston, R.I.; Feb. 13. He was emeritus professor of health sciences and nutrition at Johnson & Wales Univ. and a retired lieutenant colonel of the U.S. Air Force Medical Service. He held teaching and research positions at U.S. Air Force medical schools and hospitals before joining Johnson & Wales in 1973. He was the recipient of the Academic Pals in Gold by Minerva Univ. in Italy and was a fellow of the American Assoc. for the Advancement of Science. He was a member of the Royal Society of Health in London, the Texas Academy of Science, Phi Kappa Phi, Kappa Delta Pi, and Phi Sigma. He is survived by a cousin.

 

Jul, 2018
48

Fred R. Collins ’48, of Green Valley, Ariz., formerly of Pittsburgh and Massena, N.Y.; Mar. 2. He joined Alcoa Laboratories in New Kensington, Pa., conducting research and developing an aluminum welding metal alloy used on the fuel tanks of the Saturn V rocket. In 1967 he was named manager of the electrical products division of Alcoa Labs in Massena, N.Y. In 1975 he joined the headquarters staff of Alcoa Conductor Products Co. in Pittsburgh, retiring as vice president in 1985 and moving to Green Valley. He was active in several local organizations and was a veteran of the U.S. Navy and a member of the American Welding Society, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, and Sigma Xi. He enjoyed playing piano and organ, singing in barbershop quartets, and four-wheeling in his vintage Isuzu Trooper. He is survived by five children and their spouses, 12 grandchildren, and many great-grandchildren.
 

 

Jul, 2018
47

Ralph E. Heinzerling ’47, of Port Washington, N.Y.; Jan. 25. He was a freelance commercial artist and an accomplished sailor who won countless races; crewed on sailboat races to Hawaii, Buenos Aires, and Bermuda; and was the 1942 Snipe World Champion with his brother. He ran marathons and half marathons for more than 30 years into his early 80s. He also enjoyed playing golf, fishing, gardening, reading, and classical music. He was a World War II U.S. Navy veteran and member of Kappa Delta Rho. He is survived by three children and their spouses, four grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren.

 

Jul, 2018
47

Fred L. Corey ’47, of Woonsocket, R.I.; Feb. 16. He started a career in the construction business, working for 10 years at the Dimeo Construction Co. in Providence. In 1959 he was appointed Public Works Director for the City of Woonsocket, where he served until 1966. In 1970 he founded the Corey Construction Co., from which he retired in 1991. He additionally served as Public Safety Director for the City of Woonsocket and was president of the Municipal Public Works Assoc. He was a World War II U.S. Navy veteran and a communicant of Our Lady Queen of Martyrs Church. He enjoyed playing golf. He is survived by a daughter, a son, five grandchildren, and seven great-grandchildren.
 

 

Jul, 2018
46

Robert A. McIntosh ’46, of Hamden, Conn.; Jan. 31. He worked with Mohasco Industries, Amsterdam, N.Y., for 32 years. He retired in 1981. He was a World War II U.S. Navy veteran. He is survived by cousins.
 

 

Jul, 2018
44

John B. Hill ’44, of Chapel Hill, N.C.; Jan 26. He joined the department of pharmacology as one of the founding faculty members of the Univ. of North Carolina School of Medicine. In 1970 he left UNC to work for the Becton-Dickinson Research Center in Durham, N.C., from which he retired in 1979. He was a World War II U.S. Army veteran. In retirement he enjoyed writing, creating folk art, cooking, playing golf, and spending time with family. He is survived by three children; two sons-in-law; 12 grandchildren, including Anna Jones ’12; and five great-grandchildren.
 

 

Jul, 2018
43

Helen Lasek McCarthy ’43, of Santa Barbara, Calif.; Feb. 17. She taught for a year on an Indian reservation in Toppenish, Wash., then for two years at the Univ. of Arizona before marrying and teaching in the Tucson school system for 12 years. From 1964 to 1965 she did research in Rome, returned to the United States in 1966 and took an appointment at Santa Barbara City College, where she taught language and literature classes for more than 26 years. She retired in 1992. She enjoyed traveling, especially to England and throughout Europe. She is survived by her husband, Patrick, and a niece.

 

Jul, 2018
42

Edith M.L. Herrmann ’42, of Whitehall, Pa., formerly of Elizabeth, N.J.; Feb. 16. She was employed as the senior librarian of the catalog and reference department at the Hillside Public Library in Elizabeth for more than 30 years. She retired in 1990. She was a former deacon and choir member at Second Presbyterian Church in Elizabeth.
 

 

Jul, 2018
40

Shirley Gratenstein Biers ’40, of San Mateo, Calif., formerly of New York City; Jan. 17. She worked in the New York publicity office of British singer Gracie Fields before moving to Coral Gables, Fla., where she was a homemaker and volunteer. In 1968, after moving to California, she became a photographer and volunteered writing for Stanford Univ.’s Mid-Peninsula Urban Coalition newsletter. Among her many interests were horseback riding, hiking, playing piano, traveling, and art, specifically collage and watercolors. She exhibited her work in 2005 at Focus Gallery in San Francisco. She is survived by two daughters, a son-in-law, a niece, and three nephews.
 

 

Jul, 2018
37

Thurlow B. Bearse ’37, of Centerville, Mass.; Mar. 5. After serving in the U.S. Navy, he began working at the family business, Bradford’s Hardware of Hyannis, and retired as president. He was past president of Cummaquid Golf Club, served six years on the Town of Barnstable Finance Committee, and was a board member of Bass River Savings Bank. He enjoyed gardening, hunting, fishing, and playing golf into his 90s. He is survived by two daughters, five grandchildren, six great-grandchildren, and a niece.

 

May, 2018
GS

John P. Cook ’64 AM, of Bath, Pa.; Dec. 22. He performed fieldwork in the Canadian Yukon Territory and Alaska’s Onion Portage and investigated the prehistory of Healy Lake in Alaska before beginning work at the University of Alaska Fairbanks in 1968. There, in addition to a full teaching schedule, he was eventually in charge of all archaeological surveys and excavations north of Glennallen, before and during construction of the trans-Alaska oil pipeline, and he directed salvage excavations at Amchitka Island. In the early 1970s he cofounded the Alaska Anthropological Assoc. and in the mid-to-late 1970s he pioneered the use of x-ray fluorescence and instrumental neutron activation analysis testing the possibility of determining prehistoric trade routes. In 1980 he began working at the Bureau of Land Management, where for nearly two decades he was in charge of investigation and management of cultural resources in the trans-Alaska pipeline corridor and interior Alaska lands controlled by the U.S. Army and Air Force. He was involved with several organizations, including the Alaska State Historical Commission, the Fairbanks Borough Commission for Historic Preservation, the Canadian Archaeological Assoc., and the Society for American Archeology. He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth; two sons, including Timothy ’96 AM; a stepson; three grandchildren; a sister; a brother; and former wife, Nancy Wolens Cook ’60, ’64 MAT.

May, 2018
GS

Norma Peters Cariglia ’90 AM, of Hanover, Mass.; Dec. 5, after a long illness. She is survived by four daughters, a stepdaughter, three grandchildren, and many nieces and nephews.

 

May, 2018
GS

Alan F. Arcuri ’71 PhD, of Absecon, N.J.; Nov. 20. He taught political science at Stockton (N.J.) University, where he was instrumental in establishing the prelaw program and served as prelaw adviser. In addition, he was the academic coordinator of the Educational Opportunity Fund Summer Program, a guest lecturer at the State Police Training Academy and a core member of a high school-college cooperative program. He enjoyed playing squash. He is survived by his wife, Kris.

 

May, 2018
GS

Brian Taylor ’70 PhD, of Algonac, Mich.; Jan. 5. He retired from General Motors after 35 years. He is survived by his wife, Sharon; five children; seven grandchildren; a sister; and a brother.

 

May, 2018
GS

Wilson C. Obi ’68 ScM, of East Orange, N.J.; Aug. 16. He is survived by his wife, Chinwe; three sons; three grandchildren; a sister; and nieces and nephews.

 

May, 2018
GS

 Erik Erginer ’66 ScM, ’69 PhD, of Winston-Salem, N.C.; Oct. 31. After graduating, he returned to Istanbul to complete mandatory military service. He was discharged with the rank of lieutenant in 1972. In 1974 he returned to the United States and worked as an engineer. He held two U.S. patents for forging die design and for turbine processes. After retiring, he briefly taught high school, volunteered at the Shepherd’s Center of Greater Winston-Salem, and in 1991 helped found the Winston-Salem chapter of Women Against War. He is survived by his children; his grandchildren; a sister-in-law; a niece; and his former wife, Linda Holgate.

 

May, 2018
06

Christopher L. Fuller ’06, of Fort Lauderdale, Fla., formerly of Warren, R.I.; Nov. 30. He was LEED certified and avid about sustainability and environmental issues. He sat on several town boards. He enjoyed designing, creating, and inventing things. He also enjoyed cooking, renovating houses, and working on motor vehicles. He is survived by his wife, Deborah; his parents; a brother; a sister-in-law; and eight nieces and nephews.

 

May, 2018
97

Kevin M. Rice ’97, of San Clemente, Calif., and Barcelona, Spain; Dec. 25. For more than two decades he was a top model, working with clients that included Ralph Lauren, Chaps, J. Crew, Brooks Brothers, Gap, Victorinox, and Banana Republic. He is survived by his husband, Juanma Lopez Bravo; his parents; and three sisters.

 

May, 2018
87

William H. Perry ’87, of Franklin, Mass., formerly of Westport, Conn.; Dec. 11, of cancer. He was the retired CEO of Standard Life Investments North America. Under his tutelage the American office was voted a top-three financial services workplace for three consecutive years by Investor Magazine. Playing Brown football, he earned two first-team All-Ivy defensive tackle titles, was named to All-American  and All-Decade teams, and was inducted into the Athletic Hall of Fame. An annual award recognizing the best defensive lineman was created and named in his honor. He helped found the Brown football mentor program and in 1991 earned the Joslin Award. He is survived by his wife, Rosalie; three sons; two sisters; a brother; a niece; and 10 nephews.

May, 2018
86

Carol Bremer Gamblin ’86, of Houston; Dec. 20, after a long illness. She worked for the Houston Human Health and Services Department before settling down and raising her family. She volunteered at local veterinary clinics and at the Houston Zoo. She is survived by her husband, Philip; two daughters; her mother; a sister; and a brother.

 

May, 2018
85

Eric A. Schwartz ’85, of Wayland, Mass.; Nov.15, after a brief illness. He was a hedge fund manager with Sebago Capital and a lifelong mentor, coach, and advocate for youth sports. He is survived by his wife, Janet; two daughters; a son; and a brother.

 

May, 2018
84

Jessica Jones McBride ’84, of Bound Brook, N.J.; July 8, of breast cancer. She began her career as an investigative analyst for Safir Rosetti and most recently was at UBS Financial Services. She lived in New York, Rhode Island, Connecticut, and Illinois before settling in New Jersey. She enjoyed traveling and following basketball and football. She is survived by her husband, John ’84; a daughter; a son; two grandchildren; two sisters; and numerous nieces, nephews, and cousins.

 

May, 2018
82

Jack E. Robinson III ’82, of Duxbury, Mass.; Nov. 20. At the time of his death he had a private law practice. He earlier worked in executive positions at Continental Airlines and Eastern Airlines and then at MasterCard International. He founded a digital cellular company in the Caribbean that he later sold and was general counsel of Benistar. In 2000 he ran against Ted Kennedy for a seat in the U.S. Senate; in 2002 he ran for Secretary of the Commonwealth, and in 2006 for the U.S. House of Representatives in the Ninth District of Massachusetts. He is survived by his longtime companion, Maxine Novak; his mother; a sister; and several cousins.

 

May, 2018
81

Robert Riger ’81, of New York City; Jan 26, of complications from the flu. A publisher and author, he began his career at Book-of-the-Month Club and left to become president of the Doubleday Book Club. In 1990 he cofounded Market Partners International (MPI), a publishing consulting firm whose clients included Amazon, Jim Henson Productions, and a number of international clients. With Kermit the Frog he coauthored  One Frog Can Make a Difference: Kermit’s Guide to Life in the ’90s. Following MPI, he worked at Penguin Press and Barnes & Noble, then returned to publishing at Simon & Schuster, where he was most recently vice president and director of the Pimsleur Language Programs. At the time of his death he was working with a coauthor on Book Publishing: What Everyone Needs to Know. He was a member of the Mayflower Society and the Publishing Triangle. He enjoyed genealogy and photography. He is survived by his husband, Richard D. Piper ’76 AM; three sisters; two brothers; an aunt; two nieces; and a nephew.

 

May, 2018
73

Ronald J. Pires ’73, of West Palm Beach, Fla., formerly of Hartford, Conn.; Aug. 14, of colon cancer. He started his career at Aetna Life and Casualty in Hartford, where he rose from programmer to systems analyst, and later was a computer systems consultant. After leaving the corporate world, he worked as a waiter, did construction work, published a website, and became a political blogger. He enjoyed the ocean and fishing. He is survived by his mother; his brother, David ’71, and a sister-in-law.

 

May, 2018
70

John A. Fleishman ’70, of Baltimore; Sept. 11, after a long illness. He worked as a research scientist at the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality in Rockland, Md., for 25 years, contributing to HIV health services. In addition to rooting for Boston sports teams, he was an ardent bird-watcher and traveled extensively to see new species and experience new places. He is survived by his wife, Joan; and many friends and family members.

 

May, 2018
68

Arthur S. Grossman ’68, ’71 ScM, of Everett, Wash.; Dec. 21, of complications from ALS. He was a family physician for many years in Everett. After retiring, he taught fitness classes at the Everett YMCA and other fitness clubs and volunteered at the local clinic. He was also a volunteer coach and referee for the Washington State Youth Soccer Assoc. He was a member of the Washington State Medical Assoc. and the American Academy of Family Physicians. He enjoyed swimming, running, biking, bridge, and opera. He is survived by his wife, Virginia Vanderwicken Grossman ’70, ’71 ScM; two daughters, including Emily Grossman ’97; a son; five grandchildren; a brother; and a sister-in-law.

 

May, 2018
67

Richard G. Whipple ’67, of Louisville, Ky.; Nov. 15. He worked in New York City at Chase Manhattan Bank and European American Bank before joining Citizens Fidelity Bank (PNC Kentucky) in 1985. In 1999, he joined Fifth Third Bank and retired in 2012. He was treasurer of the board of trustees for Summit Academy (Ky.) and served on the board of directors and executive committee for Kentucky Opera. He was a longtime supporter of the Fund for the Arts, the Speed Art Museum in Louisville, and the Community Foundation of Louisville. A distance runner, he completed several New York City marathons. He is survived by his wife, Heather; a brother; and nieces and nephews.

 

May, 2018
67

Julie B. Lovins ’67, of Mountain View, Calif.; Jan. 26, of brain cancer. She taught Japanese phonology for eight years at Tokyo universities, then engineered software at Silicon Valley firms and consulted on computational linguistics. She is survived by a brother.

 

May, 2018
67

Robert H. Hammel ’67, of Canonsburg, Pa.; Jan. 1. He was the owner of the House of Robert Hammel Furniture Store in McMurray, Pa. He is survived by his wife, Mary; two children; two grandchildren; and a sister.

 

May, 2018
66

Donald K. Warfield ’66, of Fairfield, Conn.; Nov. 18, of pancreatic cancer. He was an actor for more than 50 years. His career encompassed 30 productions of Shakespeare’s plays, as well as movies and television series, including Law & Order SVU. He is survived by his wife, Laura; a daughter; a son; a daughter-in-law; a grandchild; and two brothers, including Jeffris Warfield ’69.

 

May, 2018
66

Suellen Carroll Croteau ’66, of Key West, Fla., formerly of Guilford, Conn.; Feb. 12, of cancer. She was a librarian at the Guilford Free Library and a member of the American Library Assoc., the Connecticut Library Assoc., and the Women’s National Book Assoc. before moving to Key West. She was also a member of the Junior League and the Daughters of the American Revolution. She enjoyed reading, traveling, and playing mahjong. She is survived by her husband, Michael Hayes; and two daughters.

 

May, 2018
65

Michael J. Williams ’65, of Rockport, Mass.; Dec. 15. After earning his master’s degree from Salem State University, he taught in the Beverly and Malden (Mass.) school systems until he retired in 2012. He was a member of the First Congregational Church in Rockport and is survived by his wife, Charlene; two daughters; a son; a son-in-law; a granddaughter; a brother; a niece; and a nephew.

 

May, 2018
65

Alan J. Segal ’65, of Coral Gables, Fla.; Jan. 12, of cancer. He was a retired ophthalmologist. He worked in the public health service as a general medical officer in Philadelphia and on the U.S. Coast Guard cutter Gallatin in the North Sea before setting up his ophthalmology practice in Coral Gables. He is survived by his wife, Carol; a daughter; a son, Zachary ’96; two grandsons; a sister; and three nephews.

 

May, 2018
65

Robert B. Rosen ’65, of Chicago; Jan. 4, from complications following a bone marrow transplant to treat myelofibrosis. He began his career as a real estate broker before joining Bennett & Kahnweiler Associates, where he worked for 15 years. In the early 1980s he moved to Frain Camins & Swartchild in Chicago, where he became president and was instrumental in growing the company before its sale in 1998. He was a member of the Assoc. of Industrial Real Estate Brokers and the Urban Land Institute and sat on the board of the Jewish Council on Urban Affairs and the Sleepy Hollow Condo Board. He enjoyed biking, playing tennis and basketball, and talking politics at the lakeside community of Sleepy Hollow in South Haven, Mich. He is survived by his wife, Ellen; two daughters, including Molly Rosen ’99; a son; four grandchildren; a sister; and two brothers.
 

 

May, 2018
65

Bruce K. Brahe II ’65, of Arlington, Va.; July 1. He was a former CIA Case Officer, a retired FBI Special Agent, and a veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps, in which he was a tank platoon commander. He enjoyed U.S. history, especially of World War II, and big band and swing music. He is survived by his wife, Carolyn; two daughters; a son; nine grandchildren; a sister; a brother; and 11 nieces and nephews.

 

May, 2018
63

Charles R. Warner ’63, of Minneapolis; Nov. 8. He worked at the U.S. Housing and Urban Development office in Chicago for two years before moving to the Minneapolis HUD office. Active in providing affordable housing in Minneapolis for more than four decades, he was the founder of Home Line, a statewide hotline for tenants dealing with landlord troubles that received thousands of calls over its 25 years in service. He also founded the Minnesota Housing Partnership, a nonprofit that worked for 30 years to grow and finance affordable housing statewide. In 1973 he was instrumental in organizing tenants behind the Minnesota Supreme Court decision permitting tenants to withhold rent if landlords failed to keep buildings up to code. After leaving HUD in the 1980s, he organized Minnesota’s major effort to preserve federally subsidized housing complexes. He was a U.S. Army veteran and enjoyed woodworking.

May, 2018
62

John F. Morse III ’62, of Boston; Dec. 30. He was the founder, president, and CEO of Global Access Telecommunications and worked in the broadcast and satellite industries for 30 years before retiring. He is survived by his wife, Sonya; a daughter; and a son.

 

May, 2018
61

David A. Breazeale ’61, of Novato, Calif., formerly of Farmingdale, N.J.; Dec. 6, of cancer. After serving in the U.S. Army Intelligence Corps in the Midwest and Korea, he became a math teacher and computer programmer in Newark, N.J. In 1975 he was recruited by Bank of America and moved to California. After 22 years, he left Bank of America and formed his own consulting firm, Deerfield Systems. For the last 10 years of his career he was an IT manager with McKesson Corp. He was a deacon and a member of the men’s bible group and property committee at the Presbyterian Church of Novato. He enjoyed gardening and classical and jazz music and was a fan of the New York Giants and Knicks. He is survived by his wife, Ellen; two sisters-in-law; and several nieces and nephews.

 

May, 2018
60

Fred A. Windover ’60, of Boston; Dec. 4. He worked briefly in Florida before joining Sprague Electric in Lexington, Mass., in 1967 as an attorney. He was general counsel and acting vice president with Sprague through several transitions. He retired in 2009 from Allegro Microsystems in Worcester, Mass. He served the boards of the Williamstown Theater Festival, North Adams Hospital, the Massachusetts College of the Liberal Arts, and the Worcester Art Museum. He was a member of the Massachusetts Council for the Arts. He is survived by his wife, Joan; a daughter; two sons; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; eight grandchildren; a sister; a brother; a sister-in-law; and several nieces and nephews.

 

May, 2018
60

Katherine Guthrie Bergen ’60, of Port Washington, N.Y.; Dec. 18. She worked briefly as a writer and editor in New York City and was a staff member on Nelson Rockefeller’s 1964 campaign. She was involved in Port Washington community affairs, including the Science Museum, the Community Chest, and the Landmark on Main Street. She enjoyed tennis, bridge, Scrabble, and reading. She is survived by her husband, G.S. Peter Bergen; three daughters; and four grandchildren.

 

May, 2018
59

Dana G. Willard ’59, of York, Me.; Jan. 5, after a brief illness. He worked for High Voltage Engineering in Boston and then for the Willard-Daggett Fish & Lobster Co. in Portland, Me. He returned to Massachusetts in 1978 and worked in the software industry until retiring from Lucent Technologies in 2001 and moving to York. In retirement, he painted and volunteered, helping with shoreline profiling and with educational programs at the Laudholm Farm in Wells, Me. He spent winters at Amelia Island, Fla. He is survived by two sons, two grandchildren, and a sister.

 

May, 2018
59

Lewis Roberts Jr. ’59, of Stratham, N.H.; Jan. 12. He was director of the Thompson School of Applied Sciences at UNH before he became dean of UNH Manchester. He and his wife created the nonprofit Mill Pond Center for the Performing Arts in Durham, N.H. In retirement, he enjoyed woodworking and helped found the Common Table Ministry at St. John’s Church in Portsmouth, N.H. He is survived by his wife, Judy Bell Roberts ’62; two daughters; a son; a daughter-in-law; two sons-in-law; five grandchildren; and a brother.

 

May, 2018
59

Hope Owen McMahon ’59, of Portland, Me.; Dec. 21. She taught art in K–12 school districts in Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Arizona, and Maine. She retired from the Brunswick (Me.) School Department in 2000. She is survived by a daughter, a son-in-law, two grandchildren, and two nieces.

 

May, 2018
59

Joan Cobb Boyce ’59, of Eugene, Ore., formerly of Flagstaff, Ariz.; Dec. 6. She was a homemaker and volunteer for the Flagstaff Summer Festival, where she regularly sang in the Flagstaff Oratorio Choir. In Eugene, she volunteered every year with the Oregon Bach Festival. She enjoyed hiking, camping, and visiting family in Rome, Me. She is survived by two sons, four grandchildren, and a brother.

 

May, 2018
59

Sheila McHale Bailey ’59, of Chattanooga, Tenn.; Dec. 22. She was a substance abuse counselor for the Council for Alcohol and Drug Abuse Services in Chattanooga, where she also helped establish a halfway house. She was a member of the Tennessee Assoc. of Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Counselors. She enjoyed swimming and entertaining. She is survived by a daughter, a son, a son-in-law, and three nieces.

 

May, 2018
58

Charles H. Turner ’58, of Edmonds, Wash.; Jan. 8. He had a private law practice in Chicago in the 1960s, worked in the U.S. Attorney’s office there from 1962 to 1965, and was with the regional solicitor’s office of the U.S. Department of Interior in Portland from 1965 to 1967. He was appointed U.S. Attorney for Oregon under Presidents Reagan and George H.W. Bush and was lead prosecutor in several highly publicized criminal cases. Among these were the prosecution of the American Indian Movement figures in the aftermath of AIM’s occupation of the Wounded Knee site in South Dakota; the case of a Portland State Univ. professor who plotted to bomb the National Guard armory in Portland; and the case of Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh and members of his commune for the bioterror attack in The Dalles, Oregon, in which Turner was targeted for assassination. He retired from the U.S. Attorney’s office in 1993. He was a Chicago Cubs fan and enjoyed history, especially Civil War history. He is survived by his wife, Sharol; a daughter; a son; three grandsons; a sister; and a brother.

May, 2018
58

Joseph A. Santangini ’58, of Providence; Sept. 21.

 

May, 2018
58

Edward W. Poitras ’58, of Haines City, Fla., formerly of Winter Haven, Fla.; Dec. 30. At Brown he was a member of the Glee Club and the University Chapel Choir, and worked at WBRU. After graduation and service in the U.S. Army, he worked as a radio broadcaster in Binghamton, N.Y. He later moved to Winter Haven to manage Poitras Groves citrus operations and audition for the Bach Festival Choir of Winter Park, Fla., of which he remained a member for 20 years. He was a member of St. Alban’s Episcopal Church for nearly 50 years and directed its music ministry. He also worked with Christian Prison Ministries and at the time of his death was an officer and treasurer of Faith Alive Ministries. He is survived by his wife, Kay; three daughters and their spouses; six grandchildren; a brother and sister-in-law; and three nieces.

 

May, 2018
58

William G. Olsen Jr. ’58, of New Ulm, Tex.; Dec. 24. After serving in the U.S. Air Force, he worked at IBM as a computer programmer. Later he became a consultant in custom programming. He enjoyed building and fixing things, including his home in New Ulm. He also liked cooking and recipe sharing. He is survived by four children, six grandchildren, a sister, and several nieces and nephews.

 

May, 2018
58

Charles H. Kershaw III ’58, of Contoocook, N.H., formerly of Barrington, R.I.; Dec. 14. Before joining the U.S. Air Force, he practiced family medicine in Barrington for 15 years. He was a flight surgeon and commander during his 22 years of military service and retired as a colonel. He was a member of the Order of DeMolay and served as a master counselor. He enjoyed sailing, fishing, raising Appaloosa horses, and playing guitar. He is survived by his wife, Joyce; three daughters and their spouses; and eight grandchildren.

 

May, 2018
57

Suzanne May Garber Massy ’57, of Northampton, Mass.; Oct. 11. She was a librarian at the D’Amour Library at Western New England College in Springfield, Mass., before retiring in 2000. She was also a Town of Wilbraham library trustee for 10 years and president of the Massachusetts Library Trustees Assoc. She enjoyed traveling, hiking, and biking. She is survived by her husband, William; two sons; six grandchildren; a stepdaughter; and two step-grandchildren.

 

May, 2018
57

Ralph L. Leonard Jr. ’57, of Effingham, N.H.; Jan. 17. He joined his father’s real estate business, Ralph L. Leonard & Son, in Beverly, Mass., and after his father retired, operated the business as Ralph Leonard Associates until his own retirement in 2016. He was an avid outdoorsman and enjoyed skiing, hiking, mountain climbing, boating, and horseback riding. He is survived by his wife, Patricia; seven children, eight grandchildren, two great-grandchildren; a sister; and a brother-in-law.

 

May, 2018
56

James D. Kalloger ’56, of Lynn, Mass.; Dec. 11. A U.S Army veteran of the Korean War, he joined the Lynn Police Department as patrolman for several years. He joined the Massachusetts State Police and retired as a member of its Harbor Patrol. In addition to his police work, he was a cement finisher and bricklayer for many years. He was a lifetime member of the Danvers Fish & Game Club, where he won many awards for both skeet and trap shooting, and was a member of VFW Post 1240. He played football at Brown. He is survived by his wife, Lillian; children; and grandchildren.

 

May, 2018
56

Bruce N. Abbott ’56, of Oxford, Me., formerly of West Springfield, Mass.; Dec. 23. In West Springfield, he began his career working at IBM, transitioned into insurance, and retired after 31 years with Travelers Insurance in Hartford, Conn., as a data analyst. He was a longtime member, Sunday school teacher, and choir member at Mittineague Congregational Church in West Springfield. After moving to Oxford, he joined Oxford Congregational Church and served as treasurer. He enjoyed playing cribbage and was an avid Boston sports fan. He is survived by his wife, Barbara; a daughter; three sons; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; 16 grandchildren; seven great-grandchildren; two brothers, including Douglas ’61; and two sisters-in-law.

 

May, 2018
55

Lorle Patzau Wolfson ’55, of Bryn Mawr, Pa.; Dec. 8. A commercial interior designer, she worked as a resource coordinator with several firms in Philadelphia, which allowed her to collaborate with other designers. She eventually established her own resource consulting business, Resourcing. She was involved with the Main Line Unitarian Church in Devon, Pa.; served as a host family for many foreign students; and was a board member and volunteer for Philadelphia’s Nationality Service Center, which serves immigrants. She enjoyed cooking, knitting, and needlework. She is survived by her husband, Bertram ’52; a daughter; a son; five granddaughters; and a brother.

 

May, 2018
55

John Shearing ’55, of Los Angeles, formerly of Port Murray, N.J.; Dec. 3. He was a Broadway sound designer. He served in the U.S. Army during the Korean War. After Brown, he joined his father at Masque Sound & Recording in New York City. After his father’s death, he bought out his partner, and under his direction Masque became a leading Broadway sound shop whose credits include Grease, Two Gentlemen of Verona, and Ain’t Supposed to Die a Natural Death. He was instrumental in establishing Local 922 Sound Designers Union, of which he became president. He enjoyed skiing all over the world, sailing, playing golf, and cooking. He is survived by his wife, Jane; five children and their spouses, including sons Geoffrey ’94 and James ’98; 11 grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren.

 

May, 2018
55

Everett A. Pearson ’55, of Warren, R.I. and Estero, Fla.; Dec. 24. Along with his cousin, Clinton Pearson ’52, he founded Pearson Yachts, a pioneer fiberglass boat building business company that was later owned by Grumman. He published The Lure of Sailing in 1965. With Frederick Tillotson ’68, he started Tillotson-Pearson Inc. (TPI) in Warren, which built wind blades for US Windpower, materials for Disney, and numerous other products. He earned a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Fabricators & Manufacturers Assoc. In 2002 he sold most of the business and eventually started Pearson Pilings. An avid sailor and a member of the New York Yacht Club, he competed in local-yacht-club and ocean racing. He also enjoyed playing tennis and golf. He was captain of the Brown football team and inducted into the Athletic Hall of Fame in 1983. He is survived by his wife, Virginia; two daughters; a son; a daughter-in-law; two sons-in-law; eight grandchildren; and several nieces and nephews.

 

May, 2018
55

William J. Frazier Jr. ’55, of Darien, Conn.; Jan. 27. He worked in finance for more than 20 years in New York City and ended his career at Lummis & Co. in New Canaan, Conn. He served as a Eucharistic minister, was captain of one of the local senior men’s tennis teams, and refereed youth hockey until his retirement at age 82. He was a supporter of the Stamford Symphony and the Connecticut Grand Opera, a veteran of the U.S. Navy, a former Brown rowing team member, and a member of Beta Theta Pi. He enjoyed hockey, tennis, biking, and skiing. He is survived by his wife, Jane; two daughters; a son; two sons-in-law; four grandsons; and a brother.

 

May, 2018
55

Ernest H. Fontan Jr. ’55, of Kissimmee, Fla., formerly of Lyndhurst, N.J.; Sept. 20. He was a retired corporate manager and a former salesman for Shore’s Men’s Store in Kissimmee. He is survived by his wife, Avalon; three sons; a daughter-in-law; five grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren.

 

May, 2018
55

John W. Cobb ’55, of Newburgh, N.Y.; Dec. 31. After a stint in advertising, he spent 30 years in the restaurant business, then practiced law with Cobb & Cobb for 24 years. He was a member of the New York Bar Assoc. and Psi Upsilon. He is survived by his wife, Verna Werlock Cobb ’57; five children, including son Stephen ’86; and 15 grandchildren.

 

May, 2018
54

Gordon F. Udall Jr. ’54, of North Kingstown, R.I.; Jan. 6. He worked in manufacturing for many years as vice president and general manager of Graham Mfg. in East Greenwich, R.I. He was a pilot in the U.S. Navy and later volunteered at the Quonset Air Museum, the South County Museum, and the New England Wireless and Steam Museum. He is survived by his wife, Polly; two daughters; a son; a daughter-in-law; two sons-in-law; nine grandchildren; three step-grandchildren; three great-grandchildren; one step-great-grandchild; and two sisters.

 

May, 2018
54

Alan M. Corney ’54, of Saratoga, Calif., formerly of Morristown, N.J.; Jan. 12.  He worked in the furniture industry. After retiring, he pursued his interest in boating and building and restoring wooden boats. He was a member of the New Jersey Furniture Assoc. and is survived by his wife, Judith Robinson Corney ’55; a daughter; a son; two grandchildren; and a great-grandson.

 

May, 2018
53

Bradford W. Monahon ’53, of South Kingstown, R.I.; Feb. 8. He was employed by the R.I. Department of Environmental Management and retired as the manager of the Arcadia Management Area. A veteran of the U.S. Coast Guard, he enjoyed skiing, biking, and sports car racing. He is survived by his wife, Sally; a daughter; a son; a daughter-in-law; and two grandchildren.

 

May, 2018
53

A. Edward Skoog ’53, of Springfield, Ill.; Jan. 9. After running his own general construction company for more than 15 years, he was an engineer at J.M. Jones Company until his retirement in 1994. He was past president of the Champaign Contractors Assoc. and active in local organizations. He enjoyed playing duplicate bridge and became a Life Master in 2004. A long-suffering Chicago Cubs fan, he attended two World Series games in 1945 and relished the team’s 2016  World Series championship. He is survived by a daughter, two sons, two daughters-in-law, a son-in-law, and six grandchildren.

 

May, 2018
53

Rodolfo M. Barbone ’53, of Warwick, R.I.; Jan. 1. After working as a pharmacist, he earned a master’s degree and taught math and science at Gorton Junior High School, then retired as a guidance counselor at Winman Junior High School, both in Warwick. During the Korean War he served in the U.S. Army Medical Corps. He enjoyed traveling, cooking, and playing tennis and bocce. He especially enjoyed watching his grandchildren play sports and teaching them chess. He is survived by four daughters, nine grandchildren, a sister, and several nieces and nephews.

 

May, 2018
52

Gale V. M. Wolny ’52, of Supply, N.C.; July 10, 2017. He was a retired advisory marketing representative for IBM. He served in the U.S. Air Force and was a member of Kappa Sigma. He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth.

 

May, 2018
52

Mary Fuller Loughran ’52, of Hurley, N.Y.; Dec. 11. She was a homemaker who was a member of the Hurley Library Assoc. and the Ulster Garden Club. She enjoyed traveling, knitting, reading, and listening to symphony music. She is survived by her husband, John; three sons; three daughters-in-law; grandchildren; and a brother.

 

May, 2018
52

Dorothy Batchelor DeForest ’52, of Greenville, N.Y., formerly of Catskill, N.Y.; Nov. 18. She was a homemaker actively involved in her community. She is survived by two daughters, three sons, three daughters-in-law, a son-in-law, 17 grandchildren, and 17 great-grandchildren.

 

May, 2018
52

Richard D. Blackburn ’52, of Framingham, Mass.; Dec. 14. He worked in sales for both national and international industrial computer equipment corporations, including Computron, and was vice president of sales at Computer-Link. A U.S. Army Korean War veteran, he is survived by his wife, Barbara; a daughter; a son; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; and nine grandchildren.

 

May, 2018
51

Stanley E. Salva ’51, of Durham, Conn.; Dec. 14, after a short illness. A U.S. Navy veteran, he was a retired research chemist for Uniroyal and a member of the American Chemical Society. He is survived by three sons, two daughters-in-law, eight grandchildren, and one step-grandchild.

 

May, 2018
51

Robert W. Helm ’51, of Hingham, and formerly Needham, Mass.; Dec. 12. He founded the Robert W. Helm Insurance Agency in 1955 and was cofounder of the Needham Assoc. of Independent Insurance Agents. He was a Needham Town Meeting member for 25 years and was active at Christ Episcopal Church. An avid sailor, he is survived by his wife, Bette; four sons; three daughters-in-law; 11 grandchildren; and seven great-grandchildren.

 

May, 2018
51

Bruce A. Hausman ’51, of Boca Raton, Fla., formerly of New York City; Dec. 1.

 

May, 2018
50

Oscar K. Swanson ’50, of North Smithfield, R.I., formerly of Glocester, R.I.; Dec. 23. He worked at the family owned Swanson-Gay Lumber Company in Cranston, R.I.; was a state purchasing agent for several years; and from 1971 to 1988 was a nursing home administrator at Scalabrini Villa and St. Elizabeth Home, both in Rhode Island. A U.S. Navy veteran of World War II, he was a past president of the Glocester Town Council and member of the Glocester School Committee. He is survived by two daughters, a son, a daughter-in-law, a son-in-law, four granddaughters, and a great-grandson.

 

May, 2018
50

Rodman C. Scheffer ’50, of Plymouth, N.H.; Dec. 21. He taught and coached at Northfield Mount Hermon School (Mass.) for 10 years. In 1964 he joined the Tilton (N.H.) School, where he was a teacher, coach, and academic adviser. At Brown he was an All–New England  and All-American soccer goalie and was invited to the 1948 Olympic trials. In 2015 he was inducted into the Tilton School Athletic Hall of Fame and had earlier been inducted into both the Brown and Northfield Mount Hermon Athletic Halls of Fame. A U.S. Army veteran of the Korean War, he is survived by three sons, their spouses, and two grandchildren.

 

May, 2018
48

Jeannette Jones Pollard ’48, of Essex, Conn., formerly of Devon, Pa.; Feb. 8. She devoted her life to family, arts volunteering, education, historic preservation, and travel. She worked briefly in publishing and was active with the Essex Historical Society. A supporter of the Philadelphia Orchestra, she served on the boards of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, the Landmarks Society of Philadelphia, and the Lyme Academy College of Fine Arts. She was a Pembroke class secretary for many years and with her husband, William A. Pollard ’50, provided Brown scholarships. They contributed the lead gift in the renovation of Meehan Auditorium, whose ice rink was renamed the Pollard Family Rink at Meehan Auditorium. In addition to her husband, she is survived by four daughters, including Judith Danforth ’77, Wendy Pollard ’81, and Edith Tower ’85; three sons-in-law, including Murray Danforth III ’77 and Caleb Tower ’85; eight grandchildren, including Merebea Danforth ’06, Benjamin Kurtz ’08, William Kurtz ’08, and Julia Metzger ’13; and four great-grandchildren.

May, 2018
48

Raymond E. Kassar ’48, of Vero Beach, Fla., formerly of New York City and San Francisco; Dec. 10, of Lewy body dementia. He was president of Burlington House and served on the board of directors of Burlington Industries before joining Warner Communications in 1978, where he was appointed president and CEO and was instrumental in the rapid expansion of Atari. He was director of the board of the American Hospital of Paris Foundation and was an avid art investor and collector. In 1982, Brown dedicated the Edward W. Kassar House at 151 Thayer Street, which housed the mathematics department, in memory of his father. A member of the American Society of Interior Designers and the National Bedding Company, he enjoyed his Vizsla dogs and playing tennis. He is survived by his spouse, David Ferguson, and several nieces and nephews.

 

May, 2018
47

Mary Keating Coogan ’47, of Boonton, N.J.; Dec. 20. She was a real estate agent with Mountain Lakes Realty in New Jersey and cofounder of The Barn Theater in Montville, N.J., sitting on its board of directors for many years. She enjoyed tennis, skiing, golf, and cheering for the New York Giants. She is survived by three daughters, a son, 10 grandchildren, and nine great-grandchildren.

 

May, 2018
45

Norman C. Taylor ’45, of Woodbury, Conn.; Dec. 23. He worked at Chase Brass & Copper in Waterbury, Conn., and later worked in archery manufacturing, opening a branch of Stemmler Archery in Waterbury, Conn., and in 1959 a factory in Middlebury, Conn. He was president of the Archery Trade Assoc. in 1981. He served on various Woodbury town committees and was a deacon, trustee, and church school superintendent at the First Congregational Church. He  served as trustee and president of Waterbury Hospital. A U.S. Navy World War II veteran and Eagle Scout, he earned the Silver Beaver badge for his volunteer work with the Boy Scouts. He enjoyed skiing, tobogganing, ice hockey, camping, fishing, golf, and bridge. He is survived by his wife, Adele; a daughter; three sons; a daughter-in-law; six grandchildren; and a sister.

 

May, 2018
45

Philip R. Siener ’45, of Greene and Providence, R.I.; Dec. 24, after a long illness. He was chairman and CEO of Cooley Group Holdings in Pawtucket, R.I. He was president of Agawam Hunt Club in East Providence and served on the boards of Peoples Savings Bank, the U.S. Industrial Fabrics Institute, and the Industrial Fabrics Assoc. International. A U.S. Navy veteran, he was a member of Phi Kappa Psi. He is survived by two daughters, a son, eight grandchildren, and a great-grandchild.

 

May, 2018
45

Frank H. Horton ’45, of Saco, Me., formerly of Manchester, Conn.; Jan. 7. He was a pediatrician in Manchester for 35 years. He retired in 1989 and moved to Maine, where he worked as a safety officer for Horton Smoked Seafoods in Waterboro. He was a veteran of the U.S. Navy and a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Medical Assoc. He enjoyed fly-fishing, beekeeping, gardening, and blacksmithing. He is survived by daughter Jill Horton-Lyons ’71; two sons, including Robert ’72; son-in-law James Lyons ’66; a brother; and a sister-in-law.

 

May, 2018
45

Germaine Dufault Arsove ’45, of Seattle; May 3, 2017. She worked at the Children’s Home Society of Washington, at Head Start, and as a therapist in private practice. She enjoyed gardening, beekeeping, sewing, rug latch hooking, and the opera. She is survived by four daughters, including Priscilla Arsove ’74, and three grandchildren.

 

May, 2018
43

Marie Laudati D’Avanzo ’43, of Wilmington, N.C., formerly of Cranston, R.I.; Dec. 5. A retired elementary school librarian for the Cranston school district, she was an avid golfer, tennis player, and bowler who won numerous local duckpin bowling championships. She enjoyed summers with family and friends at her beach house in Matunuck, R.I. She is survived by her husband, Donald; two daughters; a son, Donald ’73; four grandchildren; a sister, Elaine Laudati Regine ’45; nieces Phyllis Cox ’65 and Kimberleigh Cox ’90; and nephew Louis Regine ’73.

 

May, 2018
41

Electra Fogliano Gallagher ’41, of Burnsville, Minn., formerly of Pawtucket, R.I.; Feb. 13. She was a social worker with the R.I. Department of Social Welfare and then a secondary school teacher in Pawtucket until her retirement in 1965. Active in Brown reunions, she processed down College Hill for the final time at her 65th reunion in 2006. She volunteered with Meals on Wheels for more than 20 years and was a communicant of St. Mary’s Church in Pawtucket. She is survived by a son, a daughter-in-law, two granddaughters, and a nephew.

 

May, 2018
36

Barbara Johnson Ware ’36, of Saint Augustine, Fla., formerly of Rye, N.Y.; Aug. 21. She worked as an accountant for American Surety Co. and as a librarian for Rye High School (both in New York) before retiring to Florida. She was a member of the American Assoc. of University Women and enjoyed gardening. She is survived by a daughter, a son, four grandchildren, and one great-grandson.

Apr, 2018
GS

MacGregor Robinson ’96 MAT, of Pawling, N.Y.; Sept. 4, of liver cancer. He worked as an English teacher and housemaster at the Berkshire School (Mass.), and as an admissions professional and student adviser at The Gunnery (Conn.). He also worked at Trinity-Pawling School (N.Y.); and at King’s Academy in Madaba, Jordan. He is survived by two brothers, two sisters-in-law; a brother-in-law; and several nieces and nephews.

Apr, 2018
GS

Robert A. Johnson ’71 PhD, of Acton, Mass.; Nov. 4. He taught physics at Bucknell Univ. and later did consulting work. He was a member of the American Physical Society, the International Solar Energy Society, and the Federation of American Scientists. He was an Acton selectman and served on various town committees. He enjoyed playing bridge. He is survived by a son, a daughter-in-law, a grandson, two sisters, and his former wife, Elizabeth Comstock.

Apr, 2018
GS

David Gullet ’70 AM, of Ashland, Ore., formerly of Oakland, Calif.; Oct. 11. He worked for the city of Oakland as a supervisor, area manager, park/recreation manager, and assistant director. He retired in 2004. He enjoyed gardening, photography, and traveling to state and national parks. He is survived by his wife, Christina, and two children.

Apr, 2018
GS

Charles R. Jungwirth ’70 MAT, of Riverside, R.I.; Jan. 3, 2017. He was a biology teacher at Roger Williams Univ. for more than 25 years and also served as ombudsman. He is survived by his wife, Veretta; a daughter; two grandsons; two sisters; a brother; and several nieces and nephews.

Apr, 2018
GS

John D. Harper ’69 PhD, of Calgary, Canada; Oct. 24. A geologist, he worked across the globe and made significant contributions to petroleum geoscience and hydrocarbon exploration during his 50-year career. He was a professor at Memorial Univ. of Newfoundland and director of the Geological Survey of Canada, and he worked with Alconsult International and ConocoPhillips in Texas. He volunteered with the Canadian ski patrol system for 40 years, and was involved in various other community organizations. He is survived by his wife, Cathy; two sons and their spouses; and two grandchildren.

Apr, 2018
GS

Herbert G. Sutter ’69 PhD, of Canton, Ohio, formerly of Staten Island, N.Y.; Nov. 14. He taught at Union College; did research on nuclear waste in the Maryland/Washington, D.C., area; and was a consultant, but his real passion was helping people. While in Maryland, he served as a counselor and elder at Northgate Community Church and later was pastor at a church in Germantown, Md. After moving to Ohio, he was active at Canton First Friends Church, where he was an elder and taught classes, mentored young married couples, and headed up the emergency relief and food pantry ministry. He is survived by his wife, Norma; two children; four grandchildren; and five adopted grandchildren.

Apr, 2018
GS

John H. Spang ’67 ScM, ’71 PhD, of League City, Tex.; Nov. 9. He was a geology professor at the Univ. of Calgary, and then at Texas A&M, from which he retired. He was active in the American Assoc. of Petroleum Geologists, U.S. Power Squadrons, America’s Great Loop Cruisers’ Assoc., and Sigma Xi. He is survived by his wife, Terry; a son; a daughter-in-law; grandchildren; a brother; and a sister-in-law.

Apr, 2018
GS

Mark E. Connelly ’51 ScM, of Concord, Mass.; Oct. 15. He had a long career as a researcher at MIT and worked on hybrid computing, air defense, aircraft simulation, air traffic control, and mass transit. He advised numerous graduate students on their research. He was an active member of the Concord Sailfishing Group and played tennis, cribbage, and bridge. He also enjoyed reading the New York Times, the Boston Globe, and books on economics, history, and political science. He was a veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps and is survived by two daughters, a son, two daughters-in-law, two sons-in-law, 12 grandchildren, and four great-grandchildren.

Apr, 2018
11

Jay J. Gravel ’11, of Naples, Fla.; Sept. 27, after a battle with addiction. He is survived by his parents, a sister; a brother-in-law, a nephew; two grandmothers; and several extended family members.

Apr, 2018
98

Nathan Ballard ’98, of Washington, D.C.; Nov. 11, of cancer. A lifelong student and learner, he was working toward his master’s in teaching arts when he was diagnosed. He enjoyed literature, poetry, and science and wanted to excite children about learning. At Brown, he was a member of the varsity baseball team and received academic and athletic recognitions. He was an avid reader and relaxed by playing the guitar. He is survived by his parents, a sister, a niece, and many friends and family members.

Apr, 2018
87

Claudia F. Yellin ’87, of Providence; Oct. 31. She was a psychologist in private practice and at Bradley Hospital. She also held leadership positions in several professional organizations and was a member of Temple Emanu-El in Providence. She enjoyed reading, canoeing, listening to folk music, and being outdoors. She is survived by her spouse, Navah Levine; a son; her parents; a sister; a stepbrother; and two nephews.

Apr, 2018
84

Elizabeth J. Farnsworth ’84, of Amherst, Mass.; Oct. 27. She was a senior research ecologist and director of education at the New England Wild Flower Society in Framingham, Mass. She conducted research projects in plant ecology all over the world, taught at universities, and developed ecology education projects for children. Her work was recognized and supported by the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service. She served as a scientific consultant to government agencies such as the U.S. Forest Service, the U.S. National Park Service, and the Environmental Protection Agency. She published 54 scholarly papers, numerous magazine and newspaper articles, and several books. She was author of the Society’s State of the Plants report, cocreator of the Society’s Go Botany website, and wrote the “Earth Matters” column for the Daily Hampshire Gazette. She received several awards for her work, including Harvard’s Bowdoin Prize. She enjoyed building wooden boats, kayaking, playing guitar and piano, and singing in contemporary and classical chorales. She is survived by her brother, Robert L. Farnsworth ’76; a sister-in-law, Georgia N. Nigro ’76; two nephews; an aunt; and four cousins.

Apr, 2018
80

William M. Waggaman ’80, of Edgartown, Mass., formerly of Norwalk, Conn.; Oct. 21. He was a retired marketing manager. While at Brown, he was a member of the rowing team. He is survived by his wife, Audrey; two daughters; a son-in-law; his mother; a sister; and two brothers.

Apr, 2018
73

Frances S. Braine ’73, of South Orange, N.J.; Nov. 4. She worked as a project manager at the NYC Economic Development Corp. for five years, as a manager of environmental site assessments at EEA Inc. for 12 years, and as an associate and senior environmental planner at BFJ Inc. for eight years. She was also editor of MetroPlanner, the newsletter of the local chapter of the American Planning Association, for which she received the 1997 Floyd Lapp Planning Award for Editing. She published several articles and reports and was a guest lecturer at Columbia, NYU, CCNY, and Harvard. She enjoyed New York City, family vacations in the Adirondacks, and Star Trek. She is survived by her mother; brothers Bruce ’76 and Geoff ’78 and their wives; two nieces, including Kathleen Braine ’11; and a nephew.

Apr, 2018
72

Josef Mittleman ’72, of New York City; Nov. 29, from injuries sustained in a bicycle accident. An engineering professor and real estate developer. He developed such New York City luxury high-rises as The Paladin, The Grand Sutton, and Silver Tower; was responsible for redeveloping the World Trade Center; and maintained an adjunct lecturer position in engineering at Brown. He began working as a leasing and sales broker with Cross & Brown of New York in 1972 and in 1978 was promoted to vice president and subsequently a partner with Cohen Brothers. He founded his own real estate development and management company, Empire Realty Group, in 1984. From 1993 to 1996 he and his family lived in Paris, where he was president of the Brown Club of France. After returning to the United States and earning a master’s degree in education from Harvard, he joined the Brown faculty as an adjunct lecturer in the Division of Engineering. He taught and designed business management, decision-making, real estate, and entrepreneurial courses. He received the 2003 Undergraduate Student Council Teaching Excellence Award and was appointed to the President’s Advisory Committee. In 2004 he became COO of Silverstein Properties, where he worked to improve the company’s internal structure and was responsible for redeveloping the World Trade Center. He used that project as an example of organization, politics, entrepreneurship, and business practice for his engineering classes. He left Silverstein Properties in 2006 and returned to teaching full-time at Brown and writing two books. He enjoyed collecting art and donated some pieces of his collections to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. He is survived by his wife, Marsy; a daughter, Juliet Mittleman ’04; a son, Justin ’00; and a sister.  

Apr, 2018
70

James Melius ’70, ’72 MMS

Architect of aid for 9/11 first responders
 

“For most occupational or environmental illnesses, what treatment do we have?” Dr. James Melius ’70, ’72 MMS told the Niagara Sunday Gazette in the late 1980s. As director of the New York Department  of Health’s division of occupational health and environmental epidemiology, he was leading the cleanup of Forest Glen, a Niagara Falls neighborhood that became a Superfund site.  “Our best treatment,” Melius insisted, “is to stop exposure.” 

Melius, who died January 1 of cardiac arrest at his home in Copake Falls, N.Y.,  had a decades-long career as a strong advocate for workers’ health and safety, with an emphasis on prevention. His repeated testimony before Congress was key to the passage of the James Zadroga 9/11 Health and Compensation Act, which authorized billions of dollars for the medical care of first responders. “The failure of the government to properly inform and protect these people from these exposures added substantially to their health risks,” Melius testified in 2009.

As an international expert on workplace medicine, Melius was part of the cohort of U.S. experts sent to Bhopal, India, in 1984, to investigate the poisonous gas leak at the Union Carbide pesticide plant, considered one of the world’s worst industrial disasters. From 1994 until his death, Melius served the Laborers’ International Union of North America (LIUNA). “Jim was a true working class warrior,” said LIUNA general president Terry O’Sullivan, in a tribute. 

James Malcolm Melius was born on June 16, 1948, in Great Barrington, Massachusetts, and raised in nearby Copake Falls, New York. At Brown, he studied biology and managed the varsity hockey team. In a letter to the BAM from 1972, Melius’s last year in the six-year medical science program,  he and fellow members of the Brown Medical Student Society made a forceful argument that Brown should start a medical school, both to enhance the University and to improve health care in Rhode Island. 

The son of a farmer and a first-grade teacher, Melius showed concern for the working class even before the start of his career. “Quality medical care is a right rather than a privilege which must be made equally available to all people,” he and his classmates wrote in the BAM.

Melius received his MD from the University of Illinois School of Medicine and his doctorate of epidemiology from the University of Illinois School of Public Health.  

Starting with a residency in occupational medicine at Cook County Hospital in Chicago, Melius’s career was focused on reducing the number of workers killed, injured, or exposed to dangerous substances on the job. “He had an early sense of wanting to do good and remain connected to working class people,”his son Jeremy Melius told the New York Times in early January. “He had a strong sense of service.”

Melius improved occupational health practices in New York  long before he spelled out to Congress what hadn’t been done properly after 9/11 and what the procedure should be in future disaster response. In 1980, after an explosion and fire at the Chemical Control Corp. chemical storage site in Elizabeth, New Jersey, Melius got the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, where he’d worked previously, to come in and do medical evaluations of the firefighters. “It was one of the first times that firefighters were evaluated after a major incident,” a longtime former official of the International Association of Fire Fighters told the Times. “And that continues today.” 

Just months before his death, Melius coauthored an op-ed in the New York Daily News calling a monument for 9/11 first responders a moral imperative. “For them,” he wrote, “9/11 and its aftermath is still a daily battle.”

—Louise Sloan ’88

Apr, 2018
69

Richard B. Keyworth ’69, of Raleigh, N.C.; Nov. 12. He ran a family general store and did pastoral work at many of the local churches. He enjoyed reading history and spending time with his children. He is survived by his wife, Amy, and three daughters.

Apr, 2018
65

Donald C. Harris ’65, of Berlin, Conn.; Oct. 19, after a two-year battle with ALS. He worked for 35 years at Ingersoll Rand’s Torrington and Fafnir divisions in materials management, retiring in 2000. He traveled to all 50 states and 40 countries. He was chairman of both the Berlin wetlands and zoning commissions and a member of the Mayflower Society, the New Britain Museum of American Art, and the New Britain Industrial Museum. He is survived by his wife, Beverly; two sons and their wives; four grandchildren; a brother and his wife; and two nephews.

Apr, 2018
64

Phyllis Tesler Breslow ’64, of Peabody, Mass.; Nov. She worked at the Medford Public Library as head librarian in the children’s department. She enjoyed traveling. She is survived by a daughter, a sister, a brother, a sister-in-law, a brother-in-law, and five nieces and nephews.

Apr, 2018
62

James L. Thompson ’62, of Grosse Pointe, Mich.; Oct. 17. He was a civilian employee of the U.S. Army, working as a supervisory mechanical engineer in Warren, Michigan. He was active in his local church and enjoyed time with family. He is survived by his wife, Carolyn Williams Thompson ’60; a daughter; a son; and three grandsons.

Apr, 2018
61

Jack D. Fisher ’61, of Bedford, Mass., formerly of Natick, Mass.; Nov. 8. He had a long and distinguished career in the U.S. Air Force, from which he retired as colonel, serving in the Vietnam War and Desert Storm. For 11 years, he was commander of troops in Saudi Arabia and for more than 21 years was a consultant with Odyssey at Hanscom Air Force Base. He earned the Meritorious Service Medal and was a member of Phi Kappa Psi. He enjoyed family genealogy. He is survived by his wife, Joyce; two daughters; two sons; two daughters-in-law; two sons-in-law; nine grandchildren; and a great-grandchild.

Apr, 2018
61

Stephen M. Haas ’61, of LaJolla, Calif., formerly of New York City; Nov. 30. He founded Stephen M. Haas Legal Placement Inc., an executive search firm, in New York City, which specialized in assisting law firms and corporations in recruiting attorneys.

Apr, 2018
61

Frederic C. Marston III ’61, of Ewing, N.J.; Oct. 27. He was a marketing communications executive in New York City with Benton & Bowles and Doyle Dane Bernbach advertising agencies before moving to California to join CRM Inc. publishing company. Because of his experience with college marketing, he was recruited by Playboy magazine to direct the company’s college bureau. He later returned to advertising with Grey North and d’Arcy MacManus & Masius in Chicago, before joining Manpower Inc. in Milwaukee in 1980 as vice president of U.S. marketing and public relations. He spent the last 12 years of his career as a senior vice president with BVK in Milwaukee and then retired to New Jersey in 1997, where he worked part-time as a public relations consultant and an editor at Princeton’s weekly community newspaper, Town Topics. He enjoyed skiing, tennis, and golf and was a Life Master at tournament bridge. He is survived by a daughter, a son-in-law, two brothers, two sisters-in-law, and 11 nieces and nephews.

Apr, 2018
61

William D. Stamper ’61, of St. Louis, Mo.; Dec. 1, from complications of dementia. He was a captain in the U.S. Marine Corps and later was president of the W.D. Stamper Co. in St. Louis. He enjoyed flying planes, sailing, playing poker with his poker group, and bicycling. He served on several boards, including the Central Institute of the Deaf, St. Luke’s Hospital, and the St. Louis Art Museum. He is survived by his wife, Barbara; four children and their spouses; 10 grandchildren; and a brother and sister-in-law.

Apr, 2018
58

Peter Gemski ’58, of Asheville, N.C.; Mar. 15, 2017, of heart failure. He was chief of the Department of Molecular Pathology at Walter Reed Army Institute of Research in Washington, D.C., from which he retired in 1996. He was a fellow of the Infectious Diseases Society of America and a member of the American Society for Microbiology, Sigma Xi, and Phi Kappa Phi. He enjoyed jazz, playing the trumpet and flugelhorn, and acting as a band leader and arranger. He is survived by his wife, Lenny; a son; a daughter; three grandchildren; a sister, Olga Gemski Robinson ’57; a brother-in-law, John Robinson ’56; and a nephew, Chase Robinson ’85.

Apr, 2018
58

Judith Abbott Myers ’58, of Atlanta, Ga.; Oct. 11. She was a homemaker active in her community. She enjoyed playing tennis. She is survived by her husband, Dirck; three daughters; and five grandchildren.

Apr, 2018
58

Earle Webster Jr. ’58, of Raleigh, N.C.; Nov. 7. He worked as a sales manager for Blasch Precision Ceramics of New York before retiring to North Carolina. He is survived by his wife, Ethel; a daughter; two grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren.

Apr, 2018
57

Frederick J. Mernick ’57, of Wakefield, formerly of East Greenwich, R.I.; Oct. 19, after a lifelong struggle with diabetes. He was vice president of Matec Inc., for 30 years. A U.S. Air Force Korean War veteran, he was also a former clerk of the State of Rhode Island Judiciary Committee, a former member of East Greenwich Town Committee, and a former chairman of the East Greenwich Juvenile Hearing Board. He is survived by his wife, Ann; two daughters, including Lee Chartier ’77; three sons; three daughters-in-law; two sons-in-law; 12 grandchildren; and three sisters.

Apr, 2018
57

Robert A. Norman ’57, of Pinehurst, N.C.; Dec. 1. He served in the U.S. Air Force for 30 years, retiring in 1987 as a brigadier general and command pilot. He was variously assigned to Fort Leavenworth, Kans.; the Pentagon; and Ramstein and Sembach Air Bases in Germany. His final assignment was as deputy defense adviser to the U.S. NATO mission in Brussels, Belgium. After retiring from the U.S. Air Force, he remained with his family in Brussels, where he headed the European office of E Systems and then Raytheon Industries. In 2000, he retired from industry and moved to Pinehurst. He was active in the Military Officers Assoc. and the Republican Men’s Club, and he enjoyed flying his airplane and playing tennis and golf. He is survived by his wife, Christa; a daughter; a son-in-law; three granddaughters; and a sister and brother-in-law.

Apr, 2018
56

Frances Evans Justin ’56, of Clarks Summit, Pa.; Nov. 1, from Alzheimer’s. She was an organist and choir director at churches in New Brunswick, N.J., and Scranton and Ransom, Pa. She also taught piano and was an office manager for Weichert Realtors in East Brunswick, N.J. She is survived by her husband, James; a daughter; a son; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; and three granddaughters.

Apr, 2018
55

Bruce A. Bradley ’55, of Monmouth Beach, N.J.; Nov. 9. He was a supervisor at Kiely Construction for 42 years before retiring. He also served as Monmouth Beach commissioner for 19 years, was a 54-year member of the Monmouth Beach fire department, and a longtime member of the Monmouth Beach board of education and recreation departments. He is survived by his wife, Rita; four children and their spouses; 10 grandchildren; six great-grandchildren; and a sister.

Apr, 2018
55

Claire Fredette Sennott ’55, of Amherst, Mass.; Nov. 10. She was an artist and homemaker. She is survived by three daughters, a son-in-law, and five grandchildren.

Apr, 2018
54

Edward Beadle ’54, of Bel Air, Md.; Oct. 28. After graduating from the Univ. of Pennsylvania Dental School, he cofounded Media Dental Associates, where he practiced until his retirement in 1999. He advocated to bring fluoride to the Media Water Company in 1965. He was a member of the Media Rotary Club since 1986, served as its high school foreign exchange program director, and hosted many foreign exchange students. He coached baseball and basketball with the Nether Providence Athletic Assoc. in Wallingford, Pa., and was an amateur ham radio operator. He was a member of St. John Chrysostom Catholic Church for more than 50 years. He is survived by his wife, Mary Jane; a daughter; two sons; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; and six grandchildren.

Apr, 2018
54

Susan Wing Klumpp ’54, of Weston, Mass., to which she moved after living in various cities in Virginia and California; Oct. 27, of melanoma. She was a guidance counselor at Littleton Middle School in Littleton, Mass., from 1970 to 1976 and later was a school psychologist at Paradise Canyon Elementary School in La Canada, Calif., from 1978 until her retirement in 1998. She was a member of several committees and served on many boards. She enjoyed hiking, skiing, swimming, tennis, snowshoeing, canoeing, contemporary art, poetry, reading, classical music, cooking, gardening, traveling, and genealogy. She is survived by her husband, Allan; a daughter; three sons; nine grandchildren; a great-grandchild; three brothers; and 11 nieces and nephews.

Apr, 2018
54

Andrew M. Rasmussen ’54, of Corning, N.Y.; Oct. 3. He began working at Corning Glass Co. in 1962, servicing their melting plants at home and abroad until his retirement in 1995 as a senior project engineer. He was involved in various community programs and supported several animal shelters. He was a U.S. Army Korean War veteran and is survived by four daughters, a son, seven grandchildren, three great-grandchildren, a niece, and two nephews.

Apr, 2018
53

Robert E. Baldani ’53, of Loudon, Tenn., formerly of Corning, N.Y.; Nov. 1. He was vice president and operating director (technology group) at Corning Glass Works until his retirement in 1991. He was also plant manager for six years in Harrodsburg, Ky. An avid traveler, he visited all 50 states, seven continents, and more than 100 countries. He was a gourmet cook and a collector of Toby jugs. He is survived by five children, nine grandchildren, two great-grandchildren, and several nieces and nephews.

Apr, 2018
53

Mildred Seaquist Barish ’53, of Berkeley, Calif.; June 25. She was a retired English teacher. She is survived by a daughter.

Apr, 2018
53

Sarah Marshall Fell ’53, of Pine City, N.Y., formerly of Manville, R.I.; Dec. 8. She was an elementary school teacher in the Warwick and Lincoln, R.I., school districts for many years. She developed a summer camp for underprivileged children, tutored Vietnamese refugees, and contributed to many charities. She was a member of the Lime Rock Baptist Church in Lincoln, where she sang in the choir and taught Sunday school. She is survived by a daughter, two grandchildren, a sister-in-law, and nieces and nephews.

Apr, 2018
53

Philip J. Holden ’53, of Boxford, Mass.; Nov. 13, of Alzheimer’s. He was a retired electrical engineer from Stone & Webster of Boston. He enjoyed outdoor work, jogging, woodworking, traveling, and spending time with family and friends. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army. He is survived by his wife, Alice; a daughter, Megan Holden ’98; a sister; and a brother-in-law.

Apr, 2018
53

Eleanor Ekblade Seaman ’53, of Williamsburg, Va., formerly of Trumbull, Conn.; Oct. 11, after a prolonged illness. She was an associate mathematics professor at Quinnipiac Univ., where she conducted research, published, and held many workshops across Connecticut on math anxiety and restoring mathematical confidence. She was also a technical writer at QuoData in Hartford and worked as the computer services liaison at Area Cooperative Educational Services in North Haven, Conn. She enjoyed working as a florist and flower arranger and was a member of Bruton Parish Episcopal Church in Colonial Williamsburg and of Delta Kappa Gamma and Phi Beta Kappa. She was an avid bridge player and achieved the level of Bronze Life Master. She is survived by a son, a daughter-in-law, and two grandchildren.

Apr, 2018
53

N. Alan Zais ’53, of Fern Park, Fla., formerly of Forest Hills, N.Y.; Nov. 2. He worked as a bond trader on Wall Street for 20 years before becoming a realtor in Florida, from which he retired to pursue his passion of antiquing. He was a veteran of the U.S. Navy. He is survived by his wife, Helen; two sons and their wives; and three grandchildren.

Apr, 2018
52

Selma Cokely Lamensdorf ’52, of Greenwich, Conn.; Nov. 28. She worked as a financial portfolio consultant at Merrill Lynch before marrying and raising a family. She later went back to school to earn a master’s in psychology and in 1974 became a school psychologist for the Norwalk Board of Education. After a back injury, she began a lifelong interest in both the physical and spiritual side of yoga and became an instructor of advanced practice. She participated in several book clubs. Phi Beta Kappa. She is survived by three daughters, a son-in-law, and four grandchildren.

Apr, 2018
52

Joseph A. McOsker Jr. ’52, of Orleans, Mass.; Oct. 28. He was a sales representative for Textron and then Wamsutta Mills. He later founded Bradford Textile Co. in Babson Park, Mass. He was a veteran of the U.S. Navy. While at Brown he was a member of the baseball team and Delta Kappa Epsilon. He is survived by his wife, Sarah; two daughters; a son, Joseph III ’81; four stepchildren; 13 grandchildren; three great-grandchildren; and a sister.

Apr, 2018
52

Norman M. Steere ’52, of Vero Beach, Fla., and Verona, Pa.; Oct. 24. He was vice chairman and member of the board of directors at Mellon Bank in Pittsburgh. From 1970 to 1972 he was assigned to Mellon Bank’s international banking department and seconded to the Bank of London and South America as assistant manager of its principal office in Buenos Aires, Argentina. After retiring from Mellon Bank, he served as president and CEO of Citytrust in Bridgeport, Conn., for two years. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army and served on several boards, including those of Blue Cross of Western Pennsylvania, the Regional Industrial Development Corp., and Shady Side Hospital. He was also a member of numerous clubs. He is survived by his wife, Blyth Barnes Steere ’54; two daughters, including Margaret Steere ’91; a son, Jamie ’81; two grandchildren; and a sister.

Apr, 2018
51

John Calannino Jr. ’51, of San Antonio, Tex., formerly of Mobile, Ala.; Oct. 18. He joined the civil service in 1963 and worked at Kelly Air Force Base in San Antonio until his retirement in 1987. He continued to volunteer for the National Active and Retired Federal Employees Assoc., doing income taxes for seniors, and was a member of St. Luke Catholic Church, where he was a founding member of the Our Lady of Angels Family Guild. He enjoyed playing golf and bridge. He is survived by his wife, Hilda; two daughters; and three grandchildren.

Apr, 2018
51

Marilyn Dunn Dauch ’51, of Glastonbury, Conn.; Oct. 28. She was a homemaker who enjoyed gardening, reading, and traveling. She is survived by five children, 10 grandchildren, two great-grandchildren, and a sister.

Apr, 2018
51

Robert S. Fields ’51, of Stamford, Conn.; Dec. 6. He established an orthodontic practice in Stamford, from which he retired in 2016. He was a U.S. Navy veteran and served on numerous boards, including those of Stamford Hospital and Temple Beth-El. He is survived by his wife, Joan; two daughters, including Andrea Oley ’77; a son; two sons-in-law; a daughter-in-law; nine grandchildren; and a great-grandchild.

Apr, 2018
51

E. Patrick Flynn ’51, of Carmel, N.Y., formerly of New York City; Nov. 26. He had a career in real estate and bred Black Angus cattle. He was a U.S. Marine veteran of the Korean War. He enjoyed sailing, playing polo, and traveling, especially spending a few months each year at his home in France. He is survived by his partner, Toni, and her son; five children; eight grandchildren; a great-grandchild; and a sister and brother.

Apr, 2018
51

James K. Mullaney ’51, of Milford, Mass., formerly of East Greenwich, R.I.; Oct. 18. He was a directory sales manager at New England Telephone Co. for 36 years. He served in the U.S. Navy during World War II. He was a past Grand Knight for the Knights of Columbus and a past president of the March of Dimes in Providence, was active in the United Way, and was a board member of the AARP in Massachusetts. He was also the lead commentator for The Senior Scene on Milford Community Cable Television for many years. He is survived by three daughters; three sons, including James ’76; two daughters-in-law; a son-in-law; six grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren.

Apr, 2018
51

Alan M. Stone ’51, of Venice, Fla., formerly of Anchorage, Ky.; Nov. 26, from complications of Parkinson’s. After serving in the U.S. Army, he worked in manufacturing management and was active in civic organizations. In retirement he was a financial planner and was active in the First Christian Church in Venice. He is survived by his wife, Bette; a daughter a stepson; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; and three grandchildren.

Apr, 2018
50

John F. Dator ’50, of Somerset, Mass.; Dec. 6. He was the owner of J.F. Dator Real Estate in Fall River, Mass.. He served in the U.S. Navy during World War II and was president of the Mass. Assoc. of Realtors, past president of the Fall River (Mass.) Boys & Girls Club, trustee of Truesdale Hospital, treasurer of Citizens for Citizens, and a volunteer case reviewer for the Mass. Department of Social Services. He was an Outstanding Citizen of the Year and a Massachusetts Realtor of the Year and earned the Peter B. Sabra Humanitarian Award and the Boys & Girls Club Volunteer of the Year award. He is survived by his companion, Susan Sirois; two daughters; a son; a son-in-law; four grandchildren; and two great-granddaughters.

Apr, 2018
50

James E. Driscoll Jr. ’50, of Shrewsbury, Mass.; Dec. 5, after an injury. He started JDA Management Services, where he performed studies of a company’s overall operations and worked around the country for many years. He was a World War II U.S. Navy veteran and a member of the American Institute of Industrial Engineers, the National Society of Professional Engineers, and the Institute of Management Consultants. He is survived by his wife, Dorothy; a daughter; a son; two grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; and several nieces and nephews.

Apr, 2018
50

Wardwell C. Leonard Jr. ’50, of Ledyard, Conn.; Dec. 8. He was a quality control chemist for 45 years at Pfizer in Groton, Conn., retiring in 1996. He was a catcher for the Pfizer softball team and a tuba player in the Pfizer band. A U.S. Army Air Forces veteran, he was a member of the American Chemical Society, the New England Historic Genealogical Society, the Rhode Island Genealogical Society, and Ledyard Congregational Church. He enjoyed gardening, kayaking, bird-watching, camping, baking, and the opera. He is survived by his wife, Viola Lenk Leonard ’50; three daughters, including Catherine Leonard ’76 and Sarah Leonard ’85; a son; eight grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren.

Apr, 2018
49

Barbara Forbstein Arnstein ’49, of Dallas; Dec. 13. She worked for Neiman Marcus before becoming a full-time wife and mother. An accomplished pianist, she volunteered at the Jewish Community Center playing for the senior choir and at the Temple Emanu-El Judaica Gift Shop. She enjoyed playing golf and traveling. Phi Beta Kappa. She is survived by three sons, a daughter-in-law, and a sister.

Apr, 2018
49

Gala Connell Barker ’49, of Portland, Conn.; Dec. 3. She worked for a short time as a librarian at the Providence Athenaeum and worked in the back-office operations of Barker Trucking. She eventually earned her Class 1 driver’s license and enjoyed traveling the country by truck with her husband. She was an active member of the Portland Methodist Church, where she sang in the choir and played piano. She was an avid reader and could read, write, and speak five languages. She is survived by her husband, Gordon; a daughter; two sons; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; seven grandchildren; four great-grandchildren; two sisters; and several nieces and nephews.

Apr, 2018
49

Harold Ludman ’49, of Seattle; Nov. 28. An internal medicine physician, he was on the clinical faculty of the SUNY Stony Brook School of Medicine until his retirement in 2004. He served in the U.S. Army and was a member of Phi Beta Kappa, Sigma Xi, and Alpha Omega Alpha. He enjoyed gardening, traveling, reading, going to the theater, and visiting art museums around the world. He is survived by daughter Evette Ludman ’83; sons Neil ’79 and Mark ’76, ’79 MD; three grandchildren; one great-grandchild; and a sister.

Apr, 2018
49

Daniel Moore Jr. ’49, of Providence; June 25. He was a cardiologist in private practice until retiring in 1998 and a staff physician at Butler Hospital and St. Elizabeth Home in Providence, where he was medical director and chief of staff from 1978 until his retirement. A clinical instructor at Brown, he served as president of the Rhode Island Medical Assoc. and the Rhode Island Society of Internal Medicine and was a member of the American Medical Assoc. and St. Sebastian Church. He served in the U.S. Army Air Corps during World War II and earned the Distinguished Flying Cross. He is survived by his wife of 61 years, Nancy McKenna Moore ’50; four daughters; a son; three sons-in-law; and 14 grandchildren.

Apr, 2018
49

Gloria Negri ’49

Covering History
 

On a whim, Gloria Negri ’49 would sometimes hop a plane to a place she’d never been—Bangkok or Cairo, Saigon or Singapore, or Guatemala alone on a Christmas Eve.

“My experiences have not all been pretty,” she once wrote. “On more occasions than I care to remember, I have arrived in foreign lands in the middle of the night with no hotel reservations.”

During 53 years at the Boston Globe, Negri, who died last December 10 at 91, watched countless historic moments unfold, always returning to write a well-told tale. She was at Cape Kennedy for the launch of the first moon landing and in South Africa when apartheid’s grip began to loosen. She was in Fenway Park when Ted Williams hit his last home run and in Hyannis as Rose Kennedy wept in church the day after John was assassinated.

Arriving at the Globe in 1959, when the few female reporters on the staff were relegated to soft feature assignments for what was then called the women’s pages, Negri insisted that she be sent out to cover news. Through her determination, she broke ground for generations of women who later joined the Globe.

“All the women in the newsroom owe her a debt of gratitude,” says Patricia Nealon, a friend and an editor at the Globe. “She really decided that all of the news pages would be open to her. All of us who followed, followed in her footsteps.” Janet Walsh, the Globe’s weekend editor, says, “I am grateful to Gloria as one of a very few women who waged battle every day decades ago in a very male newsroom to make their voices heard.”

Gloria Negri was born on November 23, 1926, in Providence, where her father, Philip Negri, was an Italian immigrant, a carpenter, and a mason. Her mother and namesake, the former Gloria Louise Tella, was hobbled by diabetes, though Negri would share with close friends her tender memory of dancing with her mother in the kitchen when she was a girl.

Her parents had both died by the time she entered Pembroke College. “I think she worked her way through,” says her longtime friend Loretta McCabe. “I’ve always thought of Gloria as being the exemplar of true grit, because that’s what she needed.”

Negri told friends that after a summer bicycling trip in Europe she took a slow route home because the college dorms weren’t open yet, and she would have no place to stay. “I stayed on several weeks more after the other members of my group flew home,” she wrote in 2000 about the experience, “exchanging my airline ticket with a stranger I met in Amsterdam for a trip home on a freighter. While I waited for the ship to leave, I slept in hostels and other less-than-luxurious emporiums for wanderers like myself. I had several proposals, not always of marriage.”

After graduation, she worked first at the Jewish Advocate and then at the Daily Hampshire Gazette in Northampton, Massachusetts, the New Bedford Standard-Times, and the Miami Herald, where she produced a feature story every day. (She was also required to sweep the Palm Beach bureau office every night.)

Along the way, Negri, who had no immediate survivors, remained close to a trio of college friends and, later, to the children of Globe colleagues who lived nearby, who considered her an aunt whose freezer always contained ice cream for them. 

Stephen Kurkjian, a former Globe reporter and editor, says that as Negri regaled him with anecdotes about her reporting assignments, “I realized that she had covered the history of the end of the 20th century. It was always the same Gloria—notebook out, asking questions, getting as close as she could to where history was being made, whether it was in Vietnam or across the street from the Public Garden at The Ritz.”

On the event of the launch for the first moon landing in July 1969, she wrote “In daylight, standing a mere 1,500 feet from this big white behemoth that will take man to the moon, the overwhelming emotion is awe. The overwhelming urge is to pray … at dusk, as small lights round the spacecraft made it twinkle like a castle in fairyland, and again in the blackness of night, when floodlights cast Apollo 11 in a celestial halo.”

Rubbing shoulders with the Fenway faithful on September 28, 1960, while watching the Splendid Splinter’s last game, she noted that “Theodore S. Williams, baseball’s last angry man, the pride and sometimes the bane of the Sox, refused to tip his hat to the crowd throughout the game. ‘An individual to the end!’ a fan said in admiration.”

At the LBJ Ranch in October 1964, Negri was shown around in a station wagon by “a slender woman in bright pink slacks, silk blouse, and a pink chiffon scarf around her head.” Her driver was Lady Bird Johnson, the first lady. “The skin on her nose was beginning to peel from the Texas sun and there was a spring to her step that is restrained when she is in Washington,” Negri wrote. “The land is dear to Lady Bird Johnson, just as it was to the women who came West to settle years ago. And it is on the land that she can be most herself.”

Negri could cover an earthquake that killed thousands in Italy on one day and head off on vacation for her own adventure the next.

“As a longtime traveler,” she wrote, “I have always observed a few rules: Travel alone, travel lightly—just a knapsack, if possible—and never plan ahead.”

—Bryan Marquard

A longer version of this story was published in the December 12, 2017, Boston Globe.

Apr, 2018
48

M. Patricia Payne Fleck ’48, of Wakefield, R.I., formerly of Madison, Conn., and Reston, Va.; Oct. 30, after a brief illness. She was a retired teacher who taught in Rhode Island, Connecticut, and Virginia. She was a member of the American Association of University of Women, the Brown Club, and the Pembroke Club. She is survived by two daughters; three sons; five grandchildren; a sister, Mavis Perkins ’52; and 22 nieces and nephews, including Elizabeth Perkins ’76 and Kathleen Perkins ’80.

Apr, 2018
48

Marjorie Foote Knievel ’48, of Berthoud, formerly of Loveland, Colo.; Nov. 1, following a brief illness. She was a homemaker and Sunday school teacher at First Baptist Church in Loveland. After moving to Berthoud, she joined the First Presbyterian Church of Berthoud and volunteered at the McCarty-Fickel Home Museum. She served on the board of the Northern Colorado Water Conservancy District for 12 years and was a Paul Harris Fellow of the Loveland Rotary Club. She was an avid stamp collector and enjoyed playing bridge. She is survived by two sons and their wives, four grandchildren, four great-grandchildren, a sister, and six nieces and nephews.

Apr, 2018
48

Barbara McElmeal St. Martin ’48, of Exeter, N.H., formerly of Framingham, Mass.; Nov. 7. After being employed by the U.S. Census Bureau in Washington, D.C., she became a teacher in the Framingham school district. She later worked as a travel agent and bookkeeper in Natick, Mass. and was a longstanding member of St. Matthias Choir, as well as a member of the League of Women Voters, Framingham Town Meeting, and the Red Hat Society of The Meadows. She is survived by two daughters, three sons, two daughters-in-law, two sons-in-law; and eight grandchildren.

Apr, 2018
47

Eileen Cummings Heaton ’47, of Providence; Nov. 10. She was a secretary at Brown and a substitute teacher at St. Pius V School and a volunteer at Fatima Hospital, both in Providence, and a member of the Garden Club. She is survived by a daughter, two sons, and three grandchildren.

Apr, 2018
46

Charlotte Meyersohn Lebowitz ’46, of Boston; Dec. 8. She worked as a licensed social worker at the Framingham Youth Guidance Center and the Brandon School, and eventually became a school social worker with the Natick (Mass.) public schools. She was active in community activities and supported many arts programs. She enjoyed swimming, playing tennis, and traveling. She is survived by a daughter; five grandchildren, including Dov Lebowitz-Nowak ’04; two brothers; and nieces and nephews.

Apr, 2018
46

Miriam Steinhardt Lyons-Kragen ’46, of Millburn, N.J.; Nov. 1, after a brief illness. She was the former director of the Milton School in Millburn. She is survived by two daughters, a son, six grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren.

Apr, 2018
45

John C. Burgess ’45, of Lanikai, Hawaii, formerly of Palo Alto, Calif.; May 14. After serving in the U.S. Navy and earning a PhD in mechanical engineering from Stanford in 1955, he worked at SRI International and United Technologies in the San Francisco Bay area. In 1966 he moved to Hawaii, where he was a full professor and chairman of the mechanical engineering department at the Univ. of Hawaii, Manoa campus. He was president of the college faculty senate from 1969 to 1971 and retired in 1995. He was an active member of the Acoustical Society of America (ASA) and received the ASA’s Distinguished Service Citation in 1966 and a Medal of Special Merit from the Acoustical Society of Japan. He enjoyed flying gliders in California, backpacking in Hawaii and the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California, and nature photography. He is survived by his wife, Frances; a daughter; two sons; and two grandchildren.

Apr, 2018
45

Samuel B. Formal ’45, of Silver Spring, Md.; Nov. 19. He was chief of the Department of Applied Immunology at the Walter Reed Institute of Research retiring in 1993. He was a World War II U.S. Navy veteran and a member of the Society of American Bacteriologists. He is survived by his wife, Rosamond; three sons and their spouses; seven grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren.

Apr, 2018
45

Frank Merlino ’45, of Warwick, R.I.; Nov. 18. A retired cardiologist, he practiced for more than 35 years at Rhode Island Hospital, where he was president of the medical staff from 1972 to 1973. He served in the U.S. Navy during the Korean War. He was a member of the American Medical Assoc., the American College of Cardiology, and the American College of Physicians. He enjoyed reading, solving crossword puzzles, watching the Boston Red Sox, and spending time with family. He is survived by six sons, including Matthew ’78, Paul ’86, and John ’83 MD; six daughters-in-law; 12 grandchildren; a sister; and a sister-in-law.

Apr, 2018
44

William O. Harbach ’44, of Fairfield, Conn.; Dec. 18, after a brief illness. He was a television producer, director, author, and the winner of four Emmy Awards and a Peabody Award. He spent one year at Brown before enlisting in the U.S. Coast Guard. After his military service, he was hired by MGM as a stock player and appeared in Good News, Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo, Song of the Thin Man, and Killer McCoy. He lost his job in 1947 when MGM eliminated stock players to cut costs. He then moved to New York City, where he managed the nightclub act Kay Thompson and the Williams Brothers. After landing an entry-level job as an editor at NBC’s New York studio, he was soon editing, directing, and producing such shows as Blind Date. Three years later he produced a local New York program called the Knickerbocker Beer Show, starring Steve Allen; it later became The Steve Allen Show and earned Harbach a 1958 Peabody Award. He produced The Tonight Show, which went nationwide and live from New York City in June 1953. Jimmy Fallon made him an honorary guest on his first show in 2014. Harbach partnered with Nick Vanoff to produce the variety show The Hollywood Palace from 1964 to 1970, as well as multiple specials. In 1966 he cast Raquel Welch as the “Billboard Girl” on The Hollywood Palace, and in 1973 won his first Emmy for The Julie Andrews Hour. Harbach produced and directed numerous TV shows and specials that starred such well-known celebrities as Bing Crosby, Milton Berle, Glenn Miller, Carol Burnett, Bob Hope, and John Wayne. He won a second Emmy for his work on Gypsy in My Soul, a 1976 special featuring Shirley MacLaine and Lucille Ball. He enjoyed playing croquet and was inducted into the U.S. Croquet Hall of Fame in 1983. An avid sailor, he was a member of several yacht clubs and enjoyed competing in yacht races and sailing with Walter Cronkite on annual summer trips. He is survived by two daughters; two stepdaughters, including Victoria Vought ’91; and six grandchildren.

Apr, 2018
44

Elizabeth Clay Mein Taylor ’44, of Chevy Chase, Md.; Oct. 4. She served in the U.S. Cadet Nurse Corps, and in 1946 she married John Gordon Mein, a U.S. Foreign Service officer who later was U.S. Ambassador to Guatemala and assassinated in 1968. They lived in Italy, Norway, Indonesia, Brazil, the Philippines, and Guatemala. After John’s assassination, she returned to Maryland to raise their children. She was active in her local church and enjoyed singing in the choir. She served as president of the Women’s Missionary Society and started a group dedicated to working with patients from St. Elizabeth’s Hospital in Washington, D.C. She enjoyed traveling with Global Volunteers and Church World Service up to the age of 89. She also enjoyed exercising with water aerobics, growing bonsai trees, and collecting praying hands from all over the world. She is survived by a daughter; two sons, including Eric ’79; two daughters-in-law; a son-in-law; eight grandchildren; and 11 great-grandchildren.

Apr, 2018
43

Nancy Hess Spencer ’43, of Providence; Oct. 22. She worked as a writer for the Providence Journal Bulletin and later moved to advertising. She was listed in Marquis’s Who’s Who in American Women. She returned to school and obtained an additional bachelor in fine arts from Rhode Island College and became a printmaker. She joined a group of 18 Rhode Island women who exhibited their work as Nineteen on Paper. She volunteered with the International House in Providence, where she taught ESL classes and studied French. She was a lifetime member of the Providence Art Club and enjoyed traveling. She is survived by two daughters and nieces and nephews.

Apr, 2018

June Moss Handler ’43, of Hackensack, N.J.; Nov. 6, of pancreatic cancer. She was professor emeritus of early childhood education at Kean Univ. in New Jersey. After receiving a master of arts in early childhood education from Bank Street College and a doctorate in education from Columbia, she taught at Newark State College, now Kean University. Committed to the civil rights movement, she worked with a coalition of low-income parents facing limited access to child care to develop an innovative infant/toddler program in Newark called Babyland. Along with her graduate students, she founded the Coalition of Infant/Toddler Educators and helped develop and implement New Jersey’s regulations for infant care centers, which became national models. She led the state’s Head Start efforts; her dissertation was used by Head Start to develop its first national training program. She also worked with the State Division of Youth and Family Services (DYFS) and was the author of Infants and Toddlers as Members, Makers and Interpreters and numerous related articles, including “An Attempt to Change Kindergarten Children’s Attitude of Prejudice Towards the Negro.” During the 1970s she was a member of the New Jersey consultation on Ethnicity and worked toward obtaining New Jersey Department of Higher Education recognition of the importance of ethnicity. She was honored in 2006 with the Thea Bry Award given by the YCS Institute for Infant and Preschool Mental Health. After retiring from Kean, she founded a group of Bergen County Jewish, Christian, and Muslim women who met, talked, and studied together for almost a decade. She enjoyed writing poetry and traveling. She is survived by a daughter, a son, a daughter-in-law, a son-in-law, five grandchildren, four great-grandchildren, and her sister, Beverly Moss Spatt ’45.

Feb, 2018
GS

Olga K. Ingelse ’68 MAT, of Rockville, Md.; Aug. 31. She was a professor of Spanish at the Community College of Rhode Island until her retirement. She is survived by two nieces and four nephews.

Feb, 2018
GS

Iris Weidenfeld Falck Donnelly ’71 MAT, of Narragansett, R.I.; Sept. 12. She spent most of her career with the Providence school system as a bilingual kindergarten teacher and many years as a bilingual special education resource teacher. She also taught high school French and Spanish in Smithfield (R.I.) and Johnston (R.I.). In retirement, she volunteered at Sophia Academy, a school for young women from underserved communities in Rhode Island, and with adult literacy programs. She was a talented photographer. She is survived by her husband, Charles; two children; and a grandchild.

Feb, 2018
GS

Penny S. Pickett ’71 AM, ’73 PhD, of Washington, D.C.; Sept. 11, after a long illness. She worked for the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO). She was hired in 1980 as a journeyman editor helping the GAO communicate its findings to Congress and the public. She previously was part of the research team at the Folger Institute of Renaissance and 18th Century Studies in Washington, D.C. She also worked as a proofreader for U.S. News &World Report and for a time taught English literature at Georgetown.

Feb, 2018
GS

Jeanne Elizabeth Hansen Kugler ’76 MAT, of New Bedford, Mass.; Aug. 16. She taught English at Bristol Community College. She also worked as a freelancer for the university presses of  both Harvard and Yale, as well as some New York publishing houses. In retirement she enjoyed painting, gardening, and walking on the beach and in the woods. She is survived by four children, including a daughter, Anne Kugler ’90; a son, Richard ’99 PhD; seven grandchildren; and a sister.

Feb, 2018
GS

Henry J. Halko ’49 AM, ’57 PhD, of Charlton, Mass.; Sept. 24. He was a history professor at Simmons College for 37 years. He retired in 1990. He enjoyed gardening, spending time with family, and solving the New York Times crossword puzzles. He is survived by a brother and several nieces and nephews.

Feb, 2018
GS

Simon Ostrach ’49 ScM, ’50 PhD, of Pepper Pike, Ohio; Oct. 2. He was a distinguished professor emeritus of engineering at Case Western Reserve Univ. and retired director of NASA’s National Center for Space Exploration Research. A pioneer in microgravity research, he designed experiments that flew aboard the Space Shuttle in 1992 and 1995. He authored more than 150 articles and papers in scientific and engineering journals. He was instrumental in establishing new engineering schools at Rowan Univ., Florida A&M, and Florida State Univ. He was listed in many publications, including Who’s Who in Aviation History and American Men of Science. As a lecturer, he was the recipient of numerous awards and was a member of several educational societies, including the National Academy of Engineering, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the National Academy of Sciences. He also served as a consultant to many national companies and was an NCAA licensed wrestling official. He enjoyed skippering a sailboat out of Edgewater Yacht Club and driving Corvettes. He is survived by his wife, Margaret; four children, including his son, Stefan ’69; five grandchildren, including Lillian Ostrach Toborek ’07, ’08 ScM, and Sarah Ostrach ’10; and one great-grandchild.

Feb, 2018
GS

Arthur A. Ebenfield ’50 AM, Falmouth, Mass.; Oct. 7. He worked for the CIA as an analyst in Washington, D.C., for 25 years and consulted with a variety of defense firms from his home in Falmouth after retiring from the CIA. He volunteered and assisted in the chaplain’s office at Falmouth Hospital for 16 years. He enjoyed reading and playing golf. He is survived by five children, three stepchildren, five grandchildren, four great-grandchildren, and a sister.

Feb, 2018
GS

Joan Wilcox Cass ’52 ScM, of Enfield, Conn., formerly of Weathersfield, Vt.; Sept. 15. She was a member of the Enfield Congregational Church for more than 50 years and volunteered with many organizations. She enjoyed gardening, knitting, and reading. She is survived by a daughter, a son, a son-in-law, four grandchildren, two great-grandchildren, and a sister.

Feb, 2018
GS

Gordon J. Eaton ’59 PhD, of Dresher, Pa.; Sept. 7. He was a professor of science at Barrington College (R.I.), the Univ. of Lagos in Nigeria, and Delaware Valley Univ. He also held a research position at Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia. He was a veteran of World War II, having served in the U.S. Marine Corps, where he received five Battle Stars. He is survived by his wife, Trudy; three children and their spouses; a daughter-in-law; eight grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren.

Feb, 2018
GS

Rebecca Hughes Malm ’60 AM, of Ashland, Ore.; Aug. 13, of a brain bleed. She taught dance, performed, and choreographed with a local semiprofessional company. Later she became a certified practitioner of the Feldenkrais Method of Movement Education and maintained a successful practice for 25 years. She was an activist for civil rights and was involved in Unitarian Universalist congregations. She enjoyed the arts, painting, sculpting, photography, and travel. She is survived by a daughter, a son-in-law, and a granddaughter.

Feb, 2018
GS

William P. Ziemer ’61 PhD, of Waupaca, Wisc., formerly of Bloomington, Ind.; Aug. 5, of Parkinson’s. He served in the U.S. Army before joining the Indiana Univ. mathematics faculty. He retired in 2003. He lectured internationally and published four mathematics textbooks. For many years he was managing editor of the IU mathematics journal. He served a term as associate dean of the graduate school and in 1996 received Indiana Univ.’s Distinguished Faculty Award. He enjoyed singing with the Bloomington Chamber Singers and as the bass voice of the local barbershop quartet, the Bloomingtones. He sailed competitively, racing in local and regional Thistle class regattas, and enjoyed playing tennis and squash. He is survived by his wife, Suzanne; two daughters; a son; and six grandchildren.

Feb, 2018
GS

Caroline King Barnard Hall  ’66 AM,  ’73 PhD (see ’60).

Feb, 2018
GS

Mary D. Provost ’67 MAT, of Myrtle Beach, S.C., formerly of Blackstone, Mass.; Aug. 27. She taught at Blackstone High School and then North Smithfield High School (R.I.), where she was honored for 28 years of service to the North Smithfield school system. She was selected for the Presidential Award for Excellence in Science and Mathematics. She volunteered as a religious educator and a Eucharistic minister at St. Theresa’s Catholic Church in Blackstone and was an active member of the Blackstone School Committee. She is survived by her husband, Edward; seven children and their spouses; 12 grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; and seven siblings.

Feb, 2018
GS

Robert G. Sherer Jr. ’67 AM, of Little Rock, Ark.; Aug. 22. He taught part-time at North Carolina State and Tulane and had professorships at Stetson Univ. (Fla.), Alcorn State Univ. (Miss.), and Wiley College, (Tex.). Active in the civil rights movement, he participated in the March on Washington, where he heard Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. give his “I Have a Dream” speech. After moving to Little Rock, he served on the boards of the Arkansas Museum, the Univ. of Arkansas History Institute, and the Arkansas United Methodist Conference History board. He also taught at the Unity Sunday School and helped the Reconciling Ministries Network. He is survived by his wife, Carol; a daughter; a son; two grandsons; a niece; and a nephew.

Feb, 2018
GS

Hubert E. Harber Jr. ’68 MAT, of Southampton, Pa., formerly of West Chester, Pa.; Sept. 25. He was a professor of astronomy at West Chester Univ. He published several articles in Sky & Telescope and Science News in the 1970s and was the author of an astronomy and stargazing guide for the Boy Scouts of America. He was a member of the Bucks County Radio Control Club, where he flew, displayed, and discussed hand-built model planes. He also enjoyed building model trains and sailing ships. He is survived by his wife, Diane; two sons; three stepsons; and three granddaughters.

Feb, 2018
98

Samuel S. Blackman ’98, of Portland, Ore.; Aug. 27, of cardiac arrest. He was cofounder and CEO of Elemental Technologies, a pioneer in video web-streaming technology. After graduating from Brown and earning a master’s degree from UC Berkeley, he worked as an engineer for Pixelworks. He left Pixelworks in 2006 to start Elemental. He led the company from a start-up to one of Portland’s major employers before selling it to Amazon in 2015, staying on as CEO. He was a runner and ultimate disc player. He enjoyed spending time with his family and giving back to Portland. He is survived by his wife, Adriane; two sons; and his mother.

Feb, 2018
89

Gregory Maney ’89, of Hempstead, N.Y.; Sept. 2, of brain cancer. He was a sociology professor at Hofstra Univ. and codirector of the university’s Center for Civic Engagement. He was instrumental in establishing the university’s Irish studies program, did conflict-resolution work in Ireland and Israel, and helped found the Greater Uniondale Area Action Coalition. He is survived by his wife, Mary; a son, his parents; and a brother.

Feb, 2018
87

Gwendolyn Coen Basinger ’87, of Las Vegas; Aug. 5, of ovarian cancer. She was senior vice president and director of business development at DDB Needham in Chicago and an account executive at Leo Burnett (Chicago) for eight years before becoming president of the Basinger Group, an executive search company. She is survived by her husband, David, and two sons.

Feb, 2018
83

James M. Scott ’83, of Baltimore; Sept. 20, of liver cancer. He was a noted costume designer whose work was featured on stage and in operas. He began designing his first costumes as a student for Brown productions and, after graduating, went on to earn an MFA in theater from NYU. His professional career as a costume designer began with the Cubiculo Theatre in New York City in 1986 with the production of The Yellow Wallpaper. He did costume design work for several theaters in New York. In 1989 and 1990 his work was featured in Vineyard Theater productions, the Great Lakes Theatre Festival, the New York Shakespeare Festival, and the Philadelphia Drama Guild. In addition to theater work, he enjoyed designing for the Wolf Trap Opera Co., the Minnesota Opera, and Juilliard Opera Center Productions at Lincoln Center. He designed costumes for the American Ballet Theatre and for The Barber of Seville, directed by Placido Domingo. He was an amateur figure skater and designed costumes for ice skater Tomas Verner of the Czech Republic for his 2007 World Championship and the 2014 Olympic games. He was an avid world traveler and enjoyed classic Hollywood films and solving crossword puzzles. He is survived by his father and a sister.

Feb, 2018
81

Andrew M. Tager ’81, of Boston; Aug. 11, of pancreatic cancer. A physician, he served in several positions, including associate physician at Massachusetts General Hospital, associate professor at Harvard Medical School, and director of the Massachusetts General Hospital Fibrosis Research Center. In 2012 he received the Marvin I. Schwarz Research Award in Pulmonary Fibrosis and in 2017 the Recognition Award for Scientific Accomplishments from the American Thoracic Society. He enjoyed literature, philosophy, public policy, and sports. He is survived by his wife, Carolyn, and a son.

Feb, 2018
81

Carmen Scism Slaughter ’81, of Albany, N.Y.; Sept. 20. After graduation, she joined the U.S. Army. She later worked for the State of New York in various departments, most recently as a senior administrative analyst for the Dept. of Finance in Albany. She enjoyed reading, traveling, and photography. She is survived by her husband, Michael; a son; her mother; three siblings; and nieces and nephews.

Feb, 2018
80

Jonathan Resnick ’80, of Chappaqua, N.Y.; Sept. 28, due to complications from the onset of septic shock. He worked as an assignments editor and a political editor at WBZ-TV in Boston prior to helping start CNBC as their first news editor. He later joined his father’s business, Barbizon Lighting, which he built into a large lighting and rigging supply company. At Brown he was a member of the soccer team and Delta Phi Omega. He remained active with Brown as a class officer, reunion officer, and supporter of the Brown Sports Foundation. At the time of his death he was helping coordinate a soccer reunion commemorating the 1970s soccer teams that achieved great success. He enjoyed coaching boys and girls soccer in Chappaqua for two decades and was a congregant of Temple Beth El. He is survived by his wife, Sue; three children; three sisters, including Maxanne Resnick ’81; and several nieces and nephews.

Feb, 2018
79

Frank H. Buntin II ’79, of Charlemont, Mass.; Aug. 30. He retired in 2015 after 33 years with the Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation. During his tenure he received many accolades, including the director’s Supervisor of the Year Award and the Outstanding Achievement Award from the Commissioner’s Council. At Brown, he was a member of the 1976 championship football team. He enjoyed spending time with his family and doing landscaping work. He is survived by his wife, Cathleen; a daughter; a son; his father; a sister; two brothers; and nieces and nephews.

Feb, 2018
78

Mark R. Harris ’78, of Shrewsbury, Mass.; Oct. 13. He worked as a senior financial analyst at Honeywell in Newton, Mass., and director of financial planning at Bull HN Information Systems in Waltham, Mass., before joining Fidelity Management Trust in Boston, where he was director of marketing. He is survived by his wife, Nancy; three children; three grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; his mother; a sister; a brother; and two nephews.

Feb, 2018
75

Mark D. Silva ’75, of Alexandria, Va.; Aug. 1; of brain cancer. A political reporter, he began his career at small newspapers in Michigan and North Carolina before joining the Miami Herald in 1979. He reported on the 2000 presidential election recount for the Miami Herald and was a political correspondent for the Orlando Sentinel. After the Sentinel, he joined the Chicago Tribune’s Washington bureau, covering the George W. Bush administration. Later, at Bloomberg News in Washington, he shifted from reporting to management and headed a group of people covering government. Most recently he was an assistant managing editor for U.S. News & World Report, where he oversaw its “Best States” platform, ranking the 50 states on how they serve their residents. He wrote the 2008 book McCain: The Essential Guide to the Republican Nominee. He contributed to pioneering blogs, including The Swamp for the Tribune and Political Capital for Bloomberg News. He enjoyed craft beers, nature photography, and playing blues on his guitar. He is survived by his wife, Nina; a daughter; a son; and a grandson.

Feb, 2018
70

Alexander H. Gordon ’70, of Eugene, Ore; June 14.

Feb, 2018
70

Stephen P. Greene ’70, of South Kent, Conn.; Aug. 19, of cancer. He worked in real estate, nonprofit administration, and law firm administration before teaching ethics and public speaking at the Marvelwood School in South Kent from 2004 to 2013. He enjoyed poetry, art museums, traveling, playing golf, and marathon walks. He is survived by his wife, Judith, and three children.

Feb, 2018
70

Roderick H. Leong ’70, of San Francisco; Sept. 15, 2016.

Feb, 2018
70

Darrell M. Zink ’70, of Hopkins, Minn.; Nov. 10, 2016.

Feb, 2018
67

Neil Bromberg ’67, of St. Louis, Mo.; Sept. 25, of complications due to Parkinson’s. He was a math professor at Rochester Institute of Technology from 1975 to 1980 and then worked at GE Healthcare until his retirement in 2003. In retirement, he tutored in the Milwaukee city schools. He is survived by his wife, Susan Kahn Bromberg ’68; a daughter; a son, Kenneth Bromberg ’93; a son-in-law; a granddaughter; and his mother.

Feb, 2018
66

James A. Murdock ’66, of Ames, Iowa; Aug. 22, of pancreatic cancer. He was a professor of mathematics at Iowa State Univ. from 1976 to 2010. From 1970 to 1976 he taught at City College in New York City. He authored two advanced mathematical books, coauthored a third, and wrote 50 research papers, encyclopedia articles, and book reviews. He enjoyed bird watching, hiking, folk dancing, and philosophy. He is survived by his wife, Catherine; two sons; two stepchildren; and a brother.

Feb, 2018
65

Frank L. Walker Jr. ’65, of Missoula, Mont.; Aug. 19. He was an emergency room physician. During the Vietnam War he served with the Public Health Service as a doctor for the Navajo Nation in Chinle, Ariz. He sought additional training in emergency medicine in Santa Cruz, Calif., and was thereafter recruited by Community Medical Center to open their emergency room in Missoula. He is survived by his wife, Jeanine; seven children; and four grandchildren.

Feb, 2018
64

Joseph E. Green ’64, of Woodstock, Conn.; Aug. 11. He was employed by Arthur Young, Price Waterhouse, and several other firms in New York City and Boston before opening his own office in Weston, Mass., in 1995. A ham radio enthusiast, he belonged to the American Radio Relay League , the First Class CW Operator’s Club, and the CW Operator’s Club. He enjoyed cruises to the Caribbean and traveled twice on the Queen Mary 2. He is survived by his wife, Jennifer; a daughter, Barbara Green ’88; a son; a daughter-in-law; two grandchildren; a sister; an aunt; and two nieces.

Feb, 2018
64

Burt W. Howell ’64, of Homosassa, Fla.; Aug. 26. He was president and treasurer of Design for Industry, which created exhibits for trade shows, Fisher Price, and other companies. He later was a custom woodworker and designer for Thinking Outside the Square, which designed visitor information areas and museum exhibitions. In retirement, he was an avid golfer and took part in the National Suncoast Junior Golf Assoc. He is survived by his wife, Connie; a daughter; a son; and two brothers.

Feb, 2018
64

Tom Draper ’64, of Milford, Del.; Sept. 7, from injuries sustained in a biking accident. After graduating, he returned to Delaware and purchased a radio station, which became WTHD. Five years later he signed on WAFL-FM, which brought country music to the area. As the owner and president of Draper Communications, he expanded the company with the purchase of TV stations: WBOC-TV, a CBS affiliate in Salisbury, Md.; KOAM-TV, which covers Pittsburg, Kans., and Joplin, Mo.; and KGBT-TV in the Brownsville, Tex., area. In 2015, he launched WBOC-FM radio and at the time of his death was about to launch Delmarva’s newest television station, Telemundo Delmarva. A multisport athlete at Brown, he was captain of the 1964 lacrosse team, All-American and All-Ivy in lacrosse, and was inducted into the Brown Athletic Hall of Fame. He remained active, biking each day, and enjoyed hunting, hiking, and skiing. He is survived by his partner, Francesca Curtin; two daughters, including Mariah Draper Calagione ’93; two sons; a daughter-in-law; two sons-in-law; nine grandchildren; and two sisters.

Feb, 2018
63

Donald W. Mischke ’63, of Raymond, N.H.; Sept. 18. He was a retired manager of Midas Muffler shops in Seabrook, N.H.; Rochester, N.Y.; and Newburyport, Mass., and was former head of Penacook Energy in Penacook, N.H. He is survived by three children.

Feb, 2018
63

John H. Barry ’63, of Beaufort, S.C.; Aug. 17. He worked for AT&T in various positions and locations until becoming a human resources executive. He enjoyed model trains and is survived by a daughter, a son, five grandchildren, and a brother.

Feb, 2018
62

James H. Higgins III ’62, of Washington, D.C.; July 7. He was a faculty member at Governor Drummer Academy prior to working in corporate communications and marketing. He was an avid boater and traveler due to his passion for wooden boats. As a member of the Antique and Classic Boat Society he served as president from 1984 to 1985 and again in 1991 and was the recipient of the society’s highest honor, the Founders’ Award. He lectured both nationally and internationally and wrote articles about classic boats. He organized tours for boating enthusiasts and in 1987 led a trip to England’s Lake District. He was a founder of the annual Clamato Regatta (renamed the Lake Placid Regatta), a veteran of the U.S. Army, and a board member for several organizations. He is survived by a sister, a brother, three nieces, and a nephew.

Feb, 2018
62

Robert D. Klarsch ’62, of Lewisburg, Pa.; Aug. 30. He taught and coached at Winchendon School and at Cushing Academy, both in Massachusetts. He became dean of students at Wyoming Seminary in Kingston, Pa., in 1972 and in 1983 was headmaster at Annie Wright School in Tacoma, Wash., from which he retired. He served as president of the Pacific Northwest Association of Independent Schools, was on the board of the National Association of Independent Schools, and was active in community service programs. He is survived by his wife, Ellen; a daughter; a stepson; a granddaughter; a sister; a brother; a niece; and two nephews.

Feb, 2018
62

Lolt D. Proegler ’62, of Brooklyn, Mich.; Sept. 20, of brain cancer. He had a career in computer science doing statistical analysis at Landis Tool Co. in Waynesboro, Pa. He served in the U.S. Army from 1962 to 1977 and retired from the U.S. Army Reserve in 1983 with the rank of major. From 1974 to 1977 he was a programmer and systems analyst at the Army’s Operational Test and Evaluation Agency in Falls Church, Va. In 1977, he left active duty and worked for Vector Research Inc., where he was named vice president in 1991 and from which he retired as CFO in 2001. He continued to work as an independent computer consultant. He enjoyed solving puzzles and playing bridge. He is survived by his wife, Gwennie; daughter Heidi Proegler Chay ’86 and husband Dan Chay ’92; a son; a daughter-in-law; five grandchildren, including Maya Chay ’13; four brothers and their wives; a sister; and 14 nieces and nephews.

Feb, 2018
61

Lauren E. Andrews ’61, of Glocester, R.I.; Aug. 19. He taught English and math in the Providence school system but left teaching for banking. He retired as senior vice president and senior loan officer at Citizens National Bank. He was treasurer of the Town of Glocester, president and treasurer of the Glocester Heritage Society, treasurer of the Glocester Lions Club, treasurer of the Danielson Rotary, and a member of the Danielson Chamber of Commerce. He is survived by his wife, Joan; a son; a daughter-in-law; two grandchildren; and a great-grandson.

Feb, 2018
61

Francis H. Monahan ’61, of Wyckoff, N.J.; Aug. 25. He began his career as a stockbroker at GA Saxton and later was senior vice president for EF Hutton and Prudential Securities. He was a 22-year member of the Wyckoff Van Pool carpooling service and recipient of a Lifetime Van Achievement Award. He was an accomplished athlete, having played football, basketball, baseball, and golf at Brown. After college he played competitive squash for 25 years and won several tournaments as a member of the Downtown Athletic Club. He also enjoyed coaching his sons’ sports teams. He is survived by his wife, Lois; three sons; two daughters-in-law; five grandchildren; and a sister.

Feb, 2018
60

Bruce C. Barton ’60, of Littleton, Colo.; Aug. 20, of cancer. He is survived by his wife, Deborah; a daughter; two stepchildren; and three grandchildren.

Feb, 2018
60

Caroline King Barnard Hall ’60, ’66 AM, ’73 PhD, of Moon Township, Pa.; July 13. She was associate professor emerita of English and Women’s Studies at Penn State. She also taught at Fairleigh Dickinson Univ., the Univ. of New Orleans, Tulane Univ., Louisiana State Univ., Loyola of New Orleans, and Xavier Univ. of New Orleans. She was awarded senior Fulbright lectureships at the Univ. of Klagenfurt (Austria), the Univ. of Copenhagen, the Free Univ. of West Berlin, and the Univ. of Ljubljana (Slovenia). She was an accomplished cellist and enjoyed field hockey, tennis, golf, and skiing. She is survived by her husband, John Hall; a brother; and nieces and nephews.

Feb, 2018
60

Edwin W. Hansen ’60, of North Andover, Mass.; Aug. 19. He served in the U.S. Navy before beginning a career at IBM. He later was the director of research at the Boston Co. and then founder and managing director of Harbor Capital Management in Boston. He was a trustee of Stevens Memorial Library in North Andover and enjoyed athletics, traveling with family, and playing golf and bridge. He is survived by his wife, Betsy; two daughters; his mother; and a brother.

Feb, 2018
59

William B. Thompson ’59, of Philadelphia; June 27, of cancer. He joined Philadelphia’s Coordinating Office of Drug and Alcohol Abuse Programs in 1973 and retired in 2004 as deputy director. In 1964 he joined the Peace Corps as a member of the public health group, serving in Malawi for three years. He went on to lead volunteers in Somalia as assistant director for three years, returning to the United States in 1973. While in Africa he hiked Mount Kilimanjaro twice. In retirement he joined the Friends of the Wissahickon as a volunteer building projects in Wissahickon Valley. He was a lifelong weightlifter and coached novice weightlifting. He is survived by his wife, Louise; a daughter; a son; three grandchildren; and a sister.

Feb, 2018
58

Fremont J. Camerino ’58, of Niles, Ohio; Sept. 29.

Feb, 2018
58

Ronald E. Oberg ’58, of Glastonbury, Conn.; Sept. 8, of cancer. He was an information systems administrator for the State of Connecticut until he retired in 1998. He was a longtime member of the Glastonbury Yacht Club and is survived by his wife, Mary; three children and their spouses; three grandchildren; a sister; and a brother.

Feb, 2018
57

Raymond E. Dunleavy ’57, of Ocala, Fla.; Sept. 27, of cardiac arrest. He had a career in investment banking and pension investment with banks in Connecticut, New Jersey, New York, and Florida. He retired from SunTrust Bank in 1996. He enjoyed raising and showing Sealyham Terriers and was a member of the American Kennel Club. He was also a veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps. He is survived by his wife, Nancy Burgatti Dunleavy ’58; a brother, Thomas ’60; two sisters-in-law; a brother-in-law; and several nieces and nephews.

Feb, 2018
57

Alan E. Fishkin ’57, of Oklahoma City; Oct. 5. He is survived by a brother and nieces.

Feb, 2018
57

William L. Haslam ’57, of Quincy, Mass.; Aug. 13, after a brief illness. He served in the National Guard before beginning a career in publishing. He retired in 1993 as general manager of Prime National Publishing Corp. in Weston, Mass. He was an avid New England sports fan and former president of the Baseball Card Collectors Association of America. He enjoyed traveling and is survived by his wife, Verna; a daughter; a son; two stepdaughters; three grandchildren; six step-grandchildren; and two nephews.

Feb, 2018
56

Frederick F. Trost ’56, of Victor, N.Y.; June 18. He was a retired senior sales representative for Sandoz Pharmaceutical Corp. in East Hanover, N.J. He is survived by his wife, Joan; four children, and nine grandchildren.

Feb, 2018
55

Robert B. Conner ’55, of Newport, R.I.; Sept. 8. He worked at Raytheon in various positions for 40 years and retired in 2000 as an international marketing executive. He was a veteran of the U.S. Navy and active in numerous local and national sailing organizations. He was a certified International Sailing Federation judge, president of the Narragansett Bay Yachting Assoc., treasurer of the US Sailing Assoc., chairman of the Rhode Island Olympic Sailing Trials, and a director of the C. Thomas Clagett Jr. Regatta. He was a member of the New York Yacht Club Race Committee during the 1970s America’s Cup years and later served as chairman of the New York Yacht Club Race Committee and chairman of the New York Yacht Club Jury. He enjoyed listening to classical music and opera. He is survived by his wife, Ann, and several nieces and nephews.

Feb, 2018
55

Thomas S. Cottrell ’55, of Cutchogue, N.Y.; Sept. 17, of a stroke. After serving in the U.S. Navy and earning his MD, he became senior associate dean of New York Medical College in Valhalla, N.Y., in 1968. In 1979 he joined the faculty of Stony Brook Univ. as a founding member of the School of Medicine, where he was known as Doctor Tom. He had a 21-year tenure as executive associate dean and associate professor of pathology before retiring in 2000 as professor emeritus. He is survived by his wife, Jane Chichester Cottrell ’57; daughters Anne Cottrell Patin ’87 and Sarah Jane Lazar ’90; a son; two grandsons; and a brother, Stephen ’57.

Feb, 2018
55

Stewart H. Moir ’55, of Palm Desert, Calif.; June 13. He is survived by his wife, Ruth.

Feb, 2018
55

Dolores LaPorte Nazareth ’55, of Cumberland, R.I.; Sept. 30, of cancer. She was a homemaker recognized by the Rhode Island Association for Retarded Citizens for her advocacy for the developmentally disabled. She was active in alumni affairs and enjoyed genealogy. She is survived by her husband, George; four children, including Annette Nazareth ’78 of 3060 Foxhall Rd., N.W., Washington, DC 20016; eight grandchildren, including Stephanie Minor ’07 and Roger Ferguson III ’13; and one great-grandson.

Feb, 2018
55

Margaret Harper Peterson ’55, of Wolfeboro, N.H.; Sept. 25. She was a longtime active member of the Melvin Village Community Church, where she participated in the bell choir. She is survived by two daughters, a son, four grandchildren, and five great-grandchildren.

Feb, 2018
55

Albert O. Saart ’55, of Cranston, R.I.; Aug. 22. After serving in the U.S. Navy and working in the corporate world, he owned and operated Island Lock and Key on Aquidneck Island (R.I.) until he retired in 2007. He was an avid reader and enjoyed the history of World War II and watching Animal Planet. He leaves his partner, Marion Moreid; two daughters; a son; a daughter-in-law; and two sons-in-law.

Feb, 2018
54

Letty Lebeck Edes ’54, of Miramar Beach, Fla., formerly of Dallas; Oct. 14, 2016. She was a stockbroker with Reynolds & Co. in Los Angeles and later worked as an executive secretary at Verado Energy in Dallas before retiring to Florida.

Feb, 2018
54

Milton G. Franklin ’54, of Plainville, Mass.; June 8. He was retired from Texas Instruments in Attleboro, Mass.

Feb, 2018
54

Robert R. Johnson ’54, of Louisville, Ky.; Aug. 18. He was a research chemist at Brown & Williamson Tobacco in Louisville until his retirement in 1991. He held several patents and was a member of the American Chemical Society. He enjoyed traveling with friends and family. He is survived by his companion, Shirley Howard; a daughter; and five granddaughters.

Feb, 2018
54

Catharine Bancroft Sloan ’54, of East Haddam, Conn., formerly of Old Greenwich, Conn.; Aug. 16. She worked as a dental assistant for many years and was an active member of the Junior League of Greenwich and the Old Greenwich Garden Club. She enjoyed music, traveling, and spending time with her family. She is survived by her husband, David; a daughter and her husband; son David ’88 and his wife; and two granddaughters.

Feb, 2018
53

Suzanne Griffiths Bower ’53, of Southern Pines, N.C.; Oct. 14, from complications of Alzheimer’s. Over the course of 30 years she and her family moved several times and she was involved in numerous organizations and community affairs. She recruited for Brown in Virginia, Georgia, New Jersey, and Ohio. She was involved with the Moore County Arts Council and the Village Chapel in Pinehurst, N.C.; was a docent at the Cincinnati Art Museum; and was active in the Episcopal Church her entire life. She enjoyed playing bridge and tennis. She is survived by her husband, Glenn N. Bower ’52; daughters Pamela Bower-Basso ’77, Elizabeth Hudgins ’79, Emily Bower ’83, and Priscilla Bower Smyth ’87; two sons-in-law, including Joseph Basso ’77; seven grandchildren, including Elizabeth Basso ’18; and four great-grandchildren.

Feb, 2018
53

Paul M. Dubeau ’53, of Baltimore; Aug. 13, of congestive heart failure. He began a career in banking working as a teller for Baltimore Federal Savings and Loan, later Baltimore Federal Financial, and eventually rose to vice president of the bank before retiring in 1985. He enjoyed thoroughbred racing and collecting Canadian stamps. He is survived by three sons.

Feb, 2018
53

William D. Healey ’53, of Attleboro, Mass., formerly of Plainville, Va.; Sept. 9. He worked in Paraguay and Argentina as a director for the U.S. Agency for International Development and as an administrator for the U.S. General Services Administration; he also worked as an administrative officer for the Peace Corps in Washington, D.C. He was a communicant of the former Sacred Heart Church in Fall River, Mass., and an avid Boston Red Sox and Celtics fan. He is survived by two sons and their wives, two granddaughters, and several nieces and nephews.

Feb, 2018
53

Curtis F. Kruger ’53, of Pompano Beach, Fla., and East Boothbay, Me.; Dec. 9, 2016. He is survived by his wife, Nancy; three daughters, including Kristin Kight ’83; son Kurt ’77; seven grandchildren; and a sister.

Feb, 2018
53

Harold S. Prescott Jr. ’53, of El Dorado, Calif.; Apr. 23. He worked at Prescott Engineering and later with Tahoe Paradise after the purchase of his family’s business. In 1973 he reopened Prescott Engineering. He was a founding member of the Western Sierra National Bank in 1983. He retired from the engineering business in the 1990s and from the board of Western Sierra Bank in 2006. He was a Shriner and member of Hiram Lodge in El Dorado. He is survived by three sons, nine grandchildren, 16 great-grandchildren and one great-great-grandson.

Feb, 2018
53

Elizabeth Howe Verrill  ’53, of Amherst, Mass.; June 15, of a perforated colon. She taught elementary school in Cambridge, Mass., from 1953 to 1957; was a language disability tutor and language therapist at several schools in Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Maine from 1961 to 1976; was cofounder and codirector of the Willow Hill School in Sudbury, Mass., from 1970 to 1976; and was founder and director of the Listening and Learning Center of Amherst from 1988 to 2012. She was also a certified massage therapist and member of the American Massage Therapy Assoc. She enjoyed choral singing, gardening, and reading. She is survived by daughter Rebecca Verrill Smith ’80 of 36 Brooks St., Medford, MA 02155; two grandchildren; two brothers; and several nieces and nephews.

Feb, 2018
52

Stephen M. Bailey ’52, of Jaffrey, N.H., formerly of Clinton, Conn.; Sept. 21. He is survived by his twin sister, nieces, and nephews.

Feb, 2018
52

E. Howland Bowen ’52, of Little Compton, R.I.; Aug. 12. He practiced law in Providence for more than 50 years and was Little Compton’s probate judge. He served on many Little Compton boards and was a trustee of St. Catherine of Siena parish. He was also a Knight Grand Cross of the Equestrian Order of the Holy Sepulchre of Jerusalem. He is survived by daughter Margaret Manning ’96; three sons; three daughters-in-law; a son-in-law; and 12 grandchildren.

Feb, 2018
52

Robert S. MacConnell ’52, of Marshfield, Mass.; Oct. 11. He taught at Marshfield High School from 1961 to 1995 and became athletic director and a driver education instructor. At Brown he was captain of the 1952 baseball team and inducted into the Brown Athletic Hall of Fame in 1971. He was a U.S. Army veteran of the Korean War and a 48-year member of Marshfield Country Club. He is survived by his companion, Barbara Bailey; a daughter; two daughters-in-law; a son-in-law; two grandchildren; and a great-grandson.

Feb, 2018
52

Robert B. Milner ’52, of Conneautville, Pa., formerly of Winchester, Va.; Sept. 1. He was a sales representative of J.V. Arthur Inc. in Winchester before being self-employed. An accomplished musician, he played several instruments, directed church choirs, and sang in the Mendelssohn Choir in Pittsburgh. He was a master gardener and a member of the American Hemerocallis Society. He is survived by his wife, Nancy; five children; 18 grandchildren; 28 great-grandchildren; and a sister.

Feb, 2018
52

Lawrence R. Ross ’52, of Tucson, Ariz., formerly of New York City; June 28. He was a cardiologist in Manhattan for 40 years. He was an avid tennis player, an accomplished musician, and a world traveler. He is survived by his wife, Sonja Rath; a daughter; two sons; two stepdaughters; and several grandchildren.

Feb, 2018
52

Nancy Goerger Smith ’52, of Seattle; May 20. She was a homemaker who enjoyed being a military wife, reading, gardening, collecting antiques, and traveling. She is survived by her husband, John ’52; two daughters and their husbands; seven grandchildren; and one great-grandchild.

Feb, 2018
51

Kenneth E. Curewitz ’51, of Cameron Park, Calif., formerly of Framingham, Mass.; Sept. 5, of Alzheimer’s. He worked in computer design and application for Honeywell and Raytheon before becoming founder and president of the former Devonshire Computer Corp. in 1969. He earned a U.S. Patent while working at Honeywell. He enjoyed music, singing, and playing handball, in which he won many city and regional championships. He also enjoyed bowling—he achieved a perfect score of 300 in 1967—and playing golf, hitting a hole in one in the 1990s. He is survived by three sons, including Kenneth ’85, ’93 ScM; three daughters-in-law; and five grandchildren.

Feb, 2018
51

Carolyn Holt Homestead ’51, of Allentown, Pa.; Sept. 18, from pneumonia. She worked as a registered medical technologist at Rhode Island Hospital and Maimonides Medical Center in Brooklyn, N.Y., before moving to Allentown, where she was co-owner of Roto-Rooter Sewer & Drain Service in Lehigh Valley. She retired in 1993. She enjoyed gardening, cooking, and needlepoint. She is survived by her husband, John; three children; and a granddaughter.

Feb, 2018
51

Thurman Pava ’51, of Huntington, Mass.; Sept. 27. He owned and operated four Gas Mart gas stations before establishing Rosa’s Candies, where he marketed Rosa’s Fudge. He is survived by four stepdaughters, a brother, a sister-in-law, and a nephew.

Feb, 2018
51

Albert G. Watkins ’51, of Clayton, Mo.; Aug. 3, from a stroke. He spent his career as an advertising salesman and manager in the magazine business with such publications as Better Homes & Gardens, Life, Time, Collier’s, and the Condé Nast group. He is survived by his wife, Nancy McIver Watkins ’51; a daughter; four sons, including Thomas ’80 and James ’78; and six grandchildren.

Feb, 2018
50

Virginia Dolbeare Anderson ’50, of Loveland, Colo., formerly of Nederland, Colo., and Delaware, Ohio; Nov. 16, 2016, from complications of dementia. She taught English as a Second Language at Ohio Wesleyan Univ. and later to elementary school children in the Dublin, Ohio, public school system. She  served as an elected member of the Democratic Committee of Delaware County and retired in 1993, when she moved to Nederland. She remained involved in politics all her life. With the onset of dementia, she moved to Seven Lakes Memory Care home in Loveland. She was a member of the International Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages and the League of Women Voters. She enjoyed spending time in the Colorado mountains. She is survived by six children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren, and a brother.

Feb, 2018
50

Gerald W. Brady ’50, of Bloomfield, Conn.; Oct. 10. After graduating, he joined the Connecticut Air National Guard and left the Guard after eight reserve years. He earned a law degree from UConn, passed the bar in 1964, and opened the law office of Brady, Willard & Alexander in East Hartford, becoming, after 2005, a solo practitioner until his retirement in 2014. He served as an assistant corporation counsel for the town of East Hartford and later as chairman of the West Hartford Town Planning and Zoning Commission. He was an active member of the East Hartford Rotary Chapter for more than 40 years and was also active in St. Timothy’s Church. He was a member of the Connecticut and American Bar associations. He enjoyed sailing and fishing. He is survived by his wife, Jane; four children, including Catherine Brady Fernandez ’76 and Gerald Jr. ’84; and six grandchildren, including Tyler Fernandez ’11

Feb, 2018
50

Edward Dewitt III ’50, of North Falmouth, Mass., formerly of Englewood, N.J.; Sept. 8. He was a partner at Dunn & DeWitt in Falmouth before retiring. He was admitted to the practice before the U.S. Supreme Court in 1969. He served in the U.S. Army during the Korean War and was awarded many medals. He was past secretary of the Falmouth Finance Committee, trustee of the Wareham Savings Bank, and a member of the Massachusetts Bar Assoc., the Falmouth Village Improvement Society, the Falmouth Rotary Club, and the Free masons. He enjoyed hunting and fishing and is survived by two sons, two daughters-in-law, and a sister.

Feb, 2018
50

Margaret Flores Fallon ’50, of Wakefield, R.I., formerly of Norwalk, Conn.; Sept. 20. After raising a family, she taught English as a Second Language in Norwalk. She retired to Rhode Island and became an active volunteer at South County Hospital and an usher at Trinity Repertory Theater in Providence. She enjoyed traveling to Europe, playing bridge, and rooting for the Boston Red Sox and the New England Patriots.

Feb, 2018
50

Paula Fineman Gorobzov ’50, of Windsor, Conn.; Sept. 1. She was a homemaker who also worked for 20 years in retail sales at Lord & Taylor in West Hartford. She was an avid reader and enjoyed needlepoint, playing bridge, and traveling. She is survived by her husband, Seymour; a daughter and her husband; a son and his fiancée; and three grandchildren.

Feb, 2018
50

Donald W. Jillson ’50, of Bowie, Md., formerly of Hackensack, N.J.; Sept. 23. He was a Bergen County (N. J.) probation officer for 35 years and served for more than 50 years at First Baptist Church as a deacon, usher, Sunday School superintendent, and teacher before moving to Maryland. He enjoyed camping and sailing with family in the Adirondacks as well as traveling to Germany each year with his wife before her passing. He is survived by three children, seven grandchildren, three great-grandchildren, and a sister.

Feb, 2018
49

William Kloner ’49, of Manhattan; Oct. 12. He was ordained in 1954 and for more than 50 years was Rabbi at Temple Beth Emeth of Flatbush, Brooklyn. He served 32 years in the U.S. Naval Reserve, attaining the rank of captain and was appointed rear admiral in the New York Naval Militia. His ministerial capacities spread across a range of institutions, including the Navy League of the United States, the Jewish War Veterans of the U.S.A., and the Grand Lodge of Free & Accepted Masons of the State of New York. He was the head chaplain administering to rescue workers at Ground Zero. He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth; two sons, including Ken ’93; five grandchildren; and two sisters.

Feb, 2018
49

William A. McKibben ’49, of Hingham, Mass.; Sept. 16. He was a commercial pilot for Eastern Airlines until his retirement in 1984. He was a World War II navy veteran and member of Delta Upsilon. In addition to flying, he enjoyed genealogy and investing. He is survived by four daughters, three sons-in-law, and seven grandchildren.

Feb, 2018
48

Cecilia Anderson Banks ’48, of Simsbury, Conn., formerly of Huntington, N.Y.; Aug. 8. After raising a family, she earned a nursing degree and had a 20-year career at Huntington Hospital. She is survived by two daughters, a son, a daughter-in-law, two sons-in-law, and seven grandchildren.

Feb, 2018
48

Elaine Lipson Kroll ’48, of Providence; Sept. 18. She was a homemaker and lifetime member of Hadassah, which awarded her its Presidential Award. She was a member of the National Council of Jewish Women and the Rhode Island Jewish Historical Assoc. and was on the board of trustees of the Sisterhood of Temple Emanu-El. She is survived by two daughters and their spouses, two grandchildren, four great-grandchildren, and a brother.

Feb, 2018
48

Marjorie Hartmann Lieneck ’48, of Northampton, Mass.; Oct. 10. She taught English at Concordia Prep School of Concordia College and at Hastings High School, Hastings-on-Hudson, N.Y., where she was both teacher and department chair for 22 years. She served on several committees and councils. She is survived by a daughter, a son, a daughter-in-law, a son-in-law, four grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren.

Feb, 2018
47

Peter A. Neidecker ’47, of Buena Vista, Colo.; Aug. 28, after struggling with heart issues and non-Hodgkins lymphoma. He was a World War II veteran of the U.S. Navy. He later worked as a consultant in New York City then as a plant manager and director of Dominion Chain Co. in Toronto, Canada. In 1959, he founded National Wire in Denver. He served as president of the United Way of Niagara County, Canada, was on the board of trustees of the Kent Denver School, and was a member of the Rotary Club in Englewood, Colo. Delta Kappa Epsilon. He enjoyed sailing, skiing, fly-fishing, and playing tennis. He is survived by his wife, Dody; three children; eight grandchildren, and six great-grandchildren.

Feb, 2018
47

Drusilla Johnson Spraitzar ’47, of Newark, N.J.; June 2. She was a homemaker and enjoyed baking, poetry, and solving the New York Times crossword puzzles. She is survived by a daughter, a son, five grandchildren, and four great-grandsons.

Feb, 2018
47

Philip Wilson ’47, of Portsmouth, R.I.; Sept. 22. At Brown he earned the Foster Prize in French and was a Francis Wayland scholar and a member of Phi Beta Kappa. After Brown he entered the Portsmouth Priory, now the Portsmouth Abbey. In 1951 he took his vows to become a monk, continued his theological studies in Oxford, England, and was ordained a priest in 1953. His first mass was said at St. John’s Church in Warren, R.I. He lived a life of service to both the monastery and the school.

Feb, 2018
47

Nancy Joy Eaton Zang ’47, of Nashville; Jan. 9, 2017. She was a retired realtor. She is survived by a son.

Feb, 2018
46

Elizabeth Starkey Charette ’46, of Albuquerque; Aug. 3. Prior to settling in Albuquerque, where she was an ESL instructor at Albuquerque Tech Vocational Institute, she traveled and lived around the world with her husband, a U.S. diplomat. She lived in Korea, Nicaragua, Uruguay, and Guyana while teaching, writing, and earning two master’s degrees. She also earned a doctorate in educational linguistics from the Univ. of New Mexico. She published numerous scholarly papers, received a fellowship to Hunter College, and was a columnist for newspapers in Seoul, Korea; and Washington, D.C. She served as the director of both the American Nicaraguan evening school and Georgetown American University in Guyana and taught English at Kyunggi Girls High School in Seoul. She was an active member of her local church. She is survived by five children.

Feb, 2018
46

Douglas V. Crook ’46, of Kingston, N.H.; Sept. 24. He was a retired physician and chief of the medical staff at Merrimack Valley Hospital in Haverhill, Mass., where he chaired numerous committees and was appointed district medical examiner. He was a member of the Massachusetts Medical Society and a veteran of the U.S. Army. He is survived by his wife, Lorraine; a daughter and her husband; a son; five grandchildren; and six great-grandchildren.

Feb, 2018
46

George L. Heitman ’46, of Wyckoff, N.J.; Sept. 26. He served in the U.S. Navy during World War II and the Korean War. After returning from service he started Ceramics International in Mahwah, N.J., and manufactured ceramic-to-metal parts for the electronics industry. He enjoyed classic cars, boats, buying and fixing older homes to sell, and attending his grandchildren’s sporting events. He is survived by his two sons, their wives, and five grandchildren.

Feb, 2018
46

Allan J. Rosenberg ’46, of Canton, Mass.; Sept. 5. After serving in the U.S. Navy, he worked for General Electric for 40 years. He retired in 1987 as vice president of the aerospace division in King of Prussia, Pa. He was a founding member and past president of Temple Emanu-El of Marblehead, Mass., and a member of the American Society of Metals, the American Welding Society, Sigma Xi, and Tau Beta Pi. He is survived by daughter Nancy Rosenberg ’76; sons Lawrence ’72, John ’74, and Arthur ’82; two daughters-in-law; nine grandchildren, including Emily Shapiro ’09 and Daniel Rosenberg ’09, ’10 ScM; four grandchildren-in-law, including Maggie Mustard Shapiro ’07 and Meghan Patrolia Rosenberg ’10; and four great-grandchildren.

Feb, 2018
45

Mary Duncan Jacobson ’45, of Aliso Viejo, Calif.; Sept. 3, of heart failure. She was a homemaker who enjoyed participating in many Pembroke activities and clubs. She is survived by daughter Edith Jacobson ’80 and son John R. Jacobson ’73.

Feb, 2018
45

Robert E. Jacobson ’45, of Aliso Viejo, Calif.; Oct. 27, 2016, of heart failure. He was a senior scientist at Hughes Aircraft in Los Angeles from 1955 to 1985 and a docent at the Los Angeles Museum of Science and Industry from 1985 to 2000. He enjoyed traveling the world. He is survived by daughter Edith Jacobson ’80 and son John R. Jacobson ’73. 

Feb, 2018
45

Howard B. Marble Jr. ’45, of Arden, N.C., formerly of Augusta, Ga.; Sept. 1. After obtaining his dental degree from Tufts Univ., he became an oral and maxillofacial surgeon and served 23 years in the U.S. Navy, retiring in 1969 as a captain. He continued his career in Augusta, where he became head of the VA Medical Center dental department and was a professor at the Medical College of Georgia School of Dentistry. He retired in 1988. He was a member of the Massachusetts Dental Society and the American Dental Assoc. He enjoyed fishing, skiing, and playing golf. He is survived by five children, 12 grandchildren, and eight great-grandchildren.

Feb, 2018
45

Joyce Chadbourne Eschenfelder ’45, of Raleigh, N.C., formerly of Syracuse, N.Y., and Watch Hill, R.I.; Aug. 19. She worked as a chemist in Uniroyal’s Naugatuck, Conn., laboratories before marrying and moving to Syracuse. She graduated from Syracuse Univ. with a master’s in library science and was an elementary school librarian in the Liverpool (N.Y.) school district until retiring to Watch Hill. She volunteered as a librarian at Watch Hill Memorial Library and relocated to Raleigh in 2009. She is survived by four children and their spouses, eight grandchildren, and 13 great-grandchildren.

Feb, 2018
44

Jeanne Smith Swoboda Millman ’44, of Torrance, Calif.; Sept. 27. She taught first grade in the Hawthorne school system for more than 30 years. She enjoyed traveling. She is survived by a daughter, two sons, three grandchildren, two great-grandchildren, and a brother.

Feb, 2018
44

Robert E. Nelson ’44, of Hadley, N.Y., formerly of Ashburnham, Mass.; Aug. 19. While serving in the U.S. Navy during World War II, he trained to be a physician at Maryland Medical School. After the war he taught biology and coached football, baseball, and hockey at Cushing Academy in Ashburnham. He worked as a medical manager at Sanborn Co. in Waltham, Mass., where he was instrumental in the development/implementation of new medical tools. An accomplished trumpet player , he had played in both Cushing Academy and Brown orchestras. He enjoyed camping and all sports, especially golf and tennis. He is survived by his wife, Dora; two sons; a daughter-in-law; four grandchildren; and four great-granddaughters.

Feb, 2018
43

Betty Bernstein Lubar Levin ’43, of Santa Rosa, Calif., formerly of White Plains, N.Y.; San Miguel de Allende, Mexico; and Albuquerque, N. Mex.; Aug. 19. She worked for 12 years as an adult guidance counselor in a Manpower Development Training Program, co-ran a catering business, and studied handwriting analysis at the New School for Social Research in New York City. She moved to Mexico, where she lived for 16 years, and in 1991 moved to Albuquerque. In 2006, due to macular degeneration, she moved to Santa Rosa to be close to her daughter. She enjoyed literature, music, cooking, and traveling. She is survived by three daughters, including Judith Lubar Roth ’67.

Feb, 2018
43

Mary Easton Swift Spence ’43, of Bryn Mawr, Pa.; Sept. 30. She was a homemaker and volunteer at Bryn Mawr Hospital. Phi Beta Kappa. She enjoyed traveling and is survived by four children, including sons E. Clinton ’67 and Peter ’69 and their spouses; two stepsons; five grandchildren; one step-grandson; two great-grandchildren; and one step-great-grandchild.

Feb, 2018
43

Robert W. Walker ’43, of Peterborough, N.H., formerly of Cranford, N.J.; Aug. 10, after a brief illness. During World War II he participated in the government synthetic rubber program at Bell Laboratories in Murray Hill, N.J. In 1946 he joined the pharmaceutical laboratories of Merck & Co. in Rahway, N.J., as a research chemist. He retired in 1984 as a senior research fellow in drug metabolism. He was an emeritus member of the American Chemical Society, a past president of the Echo Lake Naturalists Club in Westfield, N.J., and he participated in many nature-oriented organizations. He enjoyed birding, gardening, hiking, traveling, photography, and classical music. He is survived by his wife, Molly; three children and their spouses; four grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren.

Feb, 2018
42

Joseph B. Bidwell ’42, of Tucson, Ariz.; July 3. He began a 39-year career with General Motors as a summer intern in 1941 and became a full-time employee in their research laboratories. From 1944 to 1946 he served at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory and then rejoined the GM Research Laboratories as head of the mechanical development department. He retired in 1981 as executive director of GM Research Laboratories. He held 17 patents and was a Fellow of the Society of Automotive Engineers and a member of Sigma Xi. He enjoyed winemaking, gardening, shooting, photography, flying, and traveling. He is survived by three children, three grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren.

Feb, 2018
42

Ann Plankenhorn Collins ’42, of Hingham, Mass.; Oct. 2. After graduation she entered the WAVES during World War II. She was vice president of Plankenhorn Braidworks & Penn Garment Co. in Pennsylvania during the 1940s and co-owned and managed a travel agency during the 1990s. In addition to raising a family, she was director of the Massachusetts Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Children and a director of the Family Counseling and Child Guidance Center, where she served on several committees. She was named Hingham Citizen of the Year in 2010. She was a member of various clubs and enjoyed playing golf, bowling, and sailing. She is survived by five children, four grandchildren, and seven great-grandchildren.

Feb, 2018
42

Alexander M. Watson ’42, of Bloomfield, Conn.; Aug. 2. He worked at Pratt & Whitney until he retired in 1977 as assistant manager of marketing operations. He was an active member of Immanuel Congregational Church of Hartford for more than 35 years, serving as moderator, senior deacon, and choir member. He was on the board of directors for CONCORA, the Hartford-based professional chorale. He was secretary for the Society of Automotive Engineers, Southern New England division, and a member of the Institute of Aeronautical Sciences and Kappa Sigma. He is survived by three children, five grandchildren, and six great-grandchildren.

Feb, 2018
36

H. Gerard Everall ’36, of Prescott, Ariz., formerly of McLean, Va.; Aug. 18. He had a 34-year career with Sears, Roebuck & Co. After retiring, he was elected to the Arizona State House of Representatives.  He served in the U.S. Navy during World War II. He was a treasurer of the Central Yavapai District Hospital Board, where he helped with the expansion and modernization of the community hospital. Phi Kappa Psi. He enjoyed swimming and competed into his 70s, winning World Masters championship titles. He is survived by a daughter and his son, Stephen ’69.

Feb, 2018
36

Robert W. Kenyon ’36, of Providence; Sept. 4. He was president of Kenyon Management Services in Providence and chairman of the board of trustees of the Howard Foundation. He was president of the Greater Providence Chamber of Commerce from 1966 to 1967, chairman of the Downtown Council, treasurer for the Providence Parking Assoc., and a trustee of Kent County Hospital. He was a member of the Associates of the John Carter Brown Library, the Hope Club, the Sons of the American Revolution, the former Turk’s Head Club, and Phi Sigma Kappa. He is survived by two sons and two daughters-in-law.

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